Jon Fugler

Athletic Scholarship PodcastThe weekly Recruit-Me Blog is now the weekly Recruit-Me Podcast…

The Athletic Scholarship Podcast: 15 Minutes That Will Change Your Scholarship Future.

I’ve been blogging for a few years.  Now I’ve decided to zero in on the stream of communication that is my most effective and where I can teach you the best stuff.

If you’ve got 15 minutes on the road, on the run (literally) or sitting in traffic, I’ve got fresh content for you every Tuesday.

Head on over there now for the latest episode.

BaseballIf our family hadn’t taken action over 15 years ago, who knows where our twin sons would have ended up in college?  It would have been unlikely that they would have received athletic scholarships.

Our recruiting experience changed our family.  And it really changed the lives of our sons.   They received fully paid educations because we, as a family, took the initiative to get our sons recruited.  Sure, we couldn’t guarantee how coaches would respond, but at least our sons’ abilities were seen by coaches.

Why don’t so many talented athletes ever get recruited?  It’s really quite simple.

If you’re a parent of a talented athlete, I’m sure you want the best opportunity for your son or daughter.  Helping them take the initiative is one of the best things you can do for them.  Come alongside them and work on this as a team.  And a word for athletes… Continue reading

Baseball

When we were parents on the scholarship trail for our twin sons, we didn’t have the resources that are available today.

For instance, college websites weren’t as complete as they are now.  I don’t think Facebook existed.  We really had to dig.  We needed personal conversations with coaches and administrative staff to really get a picture of that school.  Today, you’ve got just about everything at your fingertips. Continue reading

KhadadiOnce you have a coach’s interest, how do you keep it?

One of the mistakes that families make in the recruiting process is thinking that if their student-athlete is on a coach’s radar, he or she will always be.  It’s just the opposite. Unless your kid is a superstar, coaches will lose interest unless you keep them interested.  You see, they think you’ve lost interest if you don’t maintain contact. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball football

NOTE:  Recruit-Me Summer Sale ends soon.  Get Recruit-Me Premium for just $87.  Lifetime membership.

I remember the phone call with a parent who really understands the recruiting process, but the athletes on her son’s team don’t.  She told me that these athletes think that college coaches will just show up and start recruiting them.  That’s the furthest from the truth.

She told me she is the team mom, so she printed out some materials I sent her and handed them to the athletes.  At first, the kids thought she was totally wrong.  However, after reading the materials and going online to do more research, they realized she was absolutely right.

How about you?  If you’re a parent, do you think your talented son or daughter will get discovered?  It just doesn’t happen that way.  I like to see it the other way.  You need to discover the coaches and programs!  Taking the first step in a recruiting relationship is what leads to most scholarships. Continue reading

Student-athleteI’ve had many athletes  come to me and ask how to get on a coach’s radar.  My first response is always that “you have to make the first move.”  Specifically, it’s important that you make a good first impression, and that comes off the field.

You have to write a good introductory email or letter in order to get a coach’s interest.  Here are five pointers:

1. Make it your email. This email (or letter) must come from the athlete, because that’s who the coaches will want to build a relationship with.  We encourage parents to help craft the letter, but make sure it’s from the athlete.

2. Make it brief. The key to an effective letter or email can be summed up in one word: BRIEF.  The goal is not to share your life story or all your great athletic achievements.  That will come later, but a long introductory letter will turn off the coach quickly.  He’s only going to read the first page anyway. Therefore… Continue reading

College campusThe words of this college coach still ring in my ears.

“Visiting schools speaks loudly to college coaches.”

I probed further with this experienced D1 coach and he went on to tell me why.  And I thought that as fall approaches, this would be good for you to know.

We’re not talking about official visits.  You get five of those, paid for by the program.  Obviously, if your family has a genuine interest in the program, your athlete should make the official visit.  But remember the five-visit limit.  Five official visits.

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This month, receive almost $100 off your Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Take action on your fall recruiting efforts now– at a huge discount.

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But you can make as many unofficial visits as you want.  And you should do that generously, especially with schools in your state or region– where there is a sincere interest.

Let’s look at the difference between an official and unofficial visit.  The NCAA states: Continue reading

QuestionWhen it comes to evaluating their son or daughter, parents usually make one of two mistakes:

  1.  They overrate them, or
  2.  They underrate them

Let’s be honest about it.  There’s usually no way we can be objective in evaluating our kid’s athletic ability. 

If that’s the case, how can we know whether they can get a scholarship?  Or, if they can, at what level?  What’s realistic?

I know I faced each of those questions with my twin sons.  I so much wanted them to make it in college as athletes.  I believed they could get scholarships.  I’m not sure how strongly they believed it.  I led the charge and they followed … and got that fully paid education while competing in the sport they loved.

Now it’s your turn to make that call.  How far can your athlete go?  Is he or she athletic scholarship material?  Continue reading

TrackI had a great conversation one night with a man who has dedicated his life to helping student-athletes land at the right school… with the right scholarship.  We agreed on a number of points:

1.  Unless you’re a Blue Chip athlete, you will likely not be “found” by college coaches.  You need to take your scholarship efforts into your own hands as a family and get out there to be seen by college coaches.  Not only that, but you must do the right things.  A shotgun approach to this will not work.  You’ll be disappointed.  You need to have a game plan, just like you do when you’re competing as an athlete. Continue reading

NCAADon’t get caught without knowing the rules.

Whether you’re getting started on the recruiting scene or you’ve been at it for awhile, there are more rules than you can to keep track of.  Fortunately, the burden is on the coaches to abide by the rules.

However, it’s especially good to be familiar with the recruiting calendar, because it will affect your expectations.

“Why aren’t any coaches calling my kid?”  “When are we allowed to visit campuses?”

These are just a couple questions parents and athletes ask at one time or other.

The NCAA has a great resource page that answers the most-asked questions, especially about recruiting calendars.  And that’s the topic of this week’s post.

Recruiting Calendars

NCAA member schools have adopted rules to create an equitable recruiting environment that promotes student-athlete well-being. The rules define who may be involved in the recruiting process, when recruiting may occur and the conditions under which recruiting may be conducted.

Recruiting rules seek, as much as possible, to control intrusions into the lives of student-athletes.

The NCAA defines recruiting as “any solicitation of prospective student-athletes or their parents by an institutional staff member or by a representative of the institution’s athletics interests for the purpose of securing a prospective student-athlete’s enrollment and ultimate participation in the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program.”

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus.  A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

Continue reading

College football coach Brady HokeIf your son or daughter is going to get an athletic scholarship, you both need to know what college coaches are looking for, what they expect and how they do their recruiting.  In other words, you need to know what they’re thinking.  And especially what they’re thinking about your athlete.

First of all, know that coaches are trying to fill specific spots on their roster.  They’re looking ahead to your athlete’s year of entry, and they’re considering whether they have a spot for within the first couple years your son or daughter would be there.  If your athlete is in a sport that has position players, they’ll be recruited if the coach knows that slot will be open in their freshman or sophomore year.

You need to understand this point.  It doesn’t matter how talented your son or daughter is if there isn’t an opening for them.

*** For more insights, I encourage you to listen to my podcast interview with D1 coach Tom Kunis Episode #4.  We go into depth about what college coaches are looking for. ***

Second, is your athlete going to be a good fit in the program and college?  College coaches look at these things.  They want to know if the chemistry is there and if your son or daughter truly want to compete in their program.  If an athlete doesn’t want to go across the country, but his parents are pushing him, coaches will pick that up.  They want to eliminate as much chance as possible that your son or daughter will transfer.  They do their best on the front end to see if there’s a good fit. You should want that, too. Continue reading

Journey(Summer Recruiting Breakthrough Sale has begun.  Get $80-$100 off a Recruit-Me Premium purchase).

On this first day of summer, reality hits.

The major recruiting season is underway.  The next 60 days can be the road to an athletic scholarship.  The challenge is to stay on the road and not slide off the shoulder.

Let me share three things that you’ll need to do this summer to stay on the scholarship road.  Don’t get sidetracked and end up in the ditch.

You see, if you can keep your son or daughter disciplined this summer, it will yield huge benefits.  Athletic, academic and financial.

#1: Get out of the garage. The summer will pass you by if you don’t get started.  There’s a tendency to take it easy in the summer but recruiting doesn’t go on vacation in June, July and August.  If you stay in “park,” you’ll be left in the dust by other families that realize that summer is golden for recruiting. Continue reading

Track communicationIt’s been a good Recruiting Breakthrough Week. I’ve alerted you to a critical recruiting season that will happen over the next 60-90 days. Summer is huge, especially since all college sports will be out of season and the coaches are recruiting heavily.

I urge you–make this truly a Recruiting Breakthrough Week for your family. It leads to a Breakthrough Summer. Please don’t miss the golden opportunity.

Here’s your “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5.” It’s your last one and will indeed give you a recruiting edge this summer.

Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5: Track your communications with coaches with excellence. It pays off. Continue reading

Student-athleteIt’s Recruiting Breakthrough Week, an exciting and powerful week to launch your family into a game-changing summer. This is a prime recruiting season. Don’t let it pass you by.

Here’s your Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #4:

Take ownership of your recruiting process yourselves.

Because parents know so little about the ins and outs of recruiting, they are tempted to turn over control to an outside party. This can be detrimental to your son or daughter’s future. Continue reading

BaseballHere’s “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #3″, in a daily series of 5, giving you a solid edge in the critical summer recruiting season. This is Recruiting Breakthrough Week.

Breakthrough Recruiting Edge of the Day: Send updates after every season and significant educational milestone.

The key to continued interest by college coaches is “communication.”  You must keep showing interest or the coach’s interest in your athlete will fade.  Coaches have a busy schedule and a lot of recruits on their radar, so you have to keep your son or daughter in front of them. Continue reading

FootballAs promised, here’s your Recruiting “Edge of the Day #2.”  It’s Recruiting Breakthrough Week and I want to make sure this entire summer is a breakthrough.

Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day:  Make school visits.  It speaks volumes to college coaches.

Now, about school visits… Continue reading

It’s Recruiting Breakthrough Week. I’ve got a few gold nuggets to blog about this week that will give you the recruiting edge as we kick off the summer recruiting season.  I’m calling it your “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge.”

Look for them here in posts this week.

Today’s Recruiting Breakthrough

Edge of the Day:

Do not send coaches your athlete’s video link to coaches as the first step.

Unfortunately, I see this strategy all the time, but there’s a better way.

First, let me address why you shouldn’t do it.

You want your son or daughter to stand out in that first contact with coaches.  If you send a video, then your athlete is just one of hundreds… or thousands that do the very same thing.  You want to do the opposite of what other families are doing.  That’s how your son or daughter stands out right away!

The better way to use video is to first send a quality introductory packet to coaches.  The intro packet is a brief email or letter from your athlete, accompanied by a player profile or resume.  It’s a way for your athlete to introduce him or herself.  It’s a handshake.

Most families don’t do this.  This is the way to stand out right away.

Then… if the coach is interested (based on what he sees in the intro packet), he’ll contact your son or daughter and most likely ask for a video link.  The key here is that the coach is reaching out and making contact and it’s no longer one way communication.  It shows interest, and that’s what you want.  The dialogue has begun.

Send the video link when the coach requests it.

This is the right way to use video and make a proper introduction.  Coaches will appreciate this personal approach.

Look for the next Recruiting Breakthrough Edge so you can get the edge this summer in your recruiting efforts.

Athletic scholarship successAny great athlete or coach enters a season with a plan.  Without it, the season would be a disaster.  In fact, a coach would be deemed foolish if he or she didn’t map out the season, set goals, define strategy and then begin executing.

The great coach Mike Krzyzewski said, “There are a lot of people who want to win, but winners prepare to win.”

So my question to you as summer kicks off, “Is your family prepared to win an athletic scholarship?”

“I’d like to…”  “I hope…”  and “I want to…” are not phrases that tell me you’re confident you’ll get an athletic scholarship.  As a parent, you’re part of this process and your confidence level is key.  As an athlete, it’s obvious that your confidence is critically important.

I will make sure recruiting happens for your family this summer.  Are you ready for a wild ride?  You’ll be in a great position by fall when several coaches are in contact with your son or daughter and your athlete is on their radar.

This is your Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough I’m looking for 100 families who will get serious enough about the recruiting process that they’ll dedicate this summer to making it happen.  And make it happen with a plan that has goals, strategy and execution.

If you’re one of these 100 families, be prepared to dedicate your time and energy to this, and to act wisely.  I’m willing to set you on course and make sure the athlete in your family gets recruited this summer– the beginning of a successful journey to an athletic scholarship.If you’re one of those families, read this post and begin taking action.  Devour it.  Devour my latest podcast, too, because it will set you up for summer.

This is your campaign

You’ve got to have the perspective that recruiting is a series of events over a long period of time.  It’s not once and for all.  A coach doesn’t just discover your son or daughter and then it’s all done.

If you don’t like the word “campaign” (and many don’t this year), then use the word “season.”  Recruiting is a season in your family’s life.  Sunny days, rainy days, easy days, hard days.  Long days, short days.  Oh, there are so many factors in recruiting that will knock you around.  So be prepared.

Since it is a season, let’s talk about the plan, getting back to what I started with in this post.

First…

…set your goals and state them.  Here are some examples:

  • Long-term:  Jenny will receive three solid offers by spring of her senior year.
  • One-year:  Terry will have 10 coaches looking at him seriously by this time next year.
  • Short-term:  Fifteen coaches will contact Andy by July 15, 2016.

I believe you should have goals in each of those categories.  In fact, state more goals at other intervals, such as “By the end of fall season…” or “By the beginning of senior year…”

Goals are critical.  And as a sports family, you should be able to nail down these goals.  You can add performance goals to these, as well.  And academic goals.  Goals give you targets and rails to run on.

Your assignment:  Take time as a parent(s) and athlete and get away for a working session… this week!  Time is flying by, so get these goals spelled out early.

Remember, these are not cast in stone.  The purpose of the goals are to give you something tangible to shoot at and drive your actions.  These goals can change, and they will.  I saw a journal in the store yesterday, with the title, “Make Mistakes.”  It’s alright to set and re-set goals as time goes on.

Second…

… define your strategy.  You’ve got goals, but a well-defined strategy has to be in place next.  Here’s the hard work and much of it is unknown at this point.  But there are things you have to nail down in this process.  Such as…

  • In what ways will we take the initiative to get on coaches’ radars this summer?  Map out the how.  Put the actions into your calendar so you are accountable to yourselves.
  • Which schools are at the top of our list (please have at least 10)?  We will get the contact information for each coach by June 10.
  • Plan one week this summer when you can visit 2-3 schools nearby to get the feel for college campuses.  Make an appointment with the coaches and staff in admissions.  Choose these schools even if you don’t have a keen interest there.  The purpose is to see a college campus, experience meeting with a coach without pressure, and spend time in the academic area.
  • Research the following:  (1) How to put together a dynamite intro packet, (2) How to produce a quality video, (3) How to interview a college coach, (4) NCAA recruiting rules and recruiting calendars.

Third…

… execute your strategy.  In his book Chess Not Checkers, Mark Miller lays out four elements to success in business.  The fourth one certainly applies to athletics:  Excel at Execution. 

This applies to winning an athletic scholarship.  A written strategy isn’t worth the iPad it’s written on unless it is followed by committed execution.  Execution that excels.

Your athlete may excel at running, shooting, hitting or kicking.  Well, it’s time to excel at executing your recruiting strategy.

That requires three things– at least:

  • Discipline.  You’ve got to stay at it.  This is not a short-haul effort.  You’ve got a carefully thought-out strategy and blueprint written out.  Stick with it for the long haul.
  • Evaluation.  How’s your strategy and execution doing?  Make mid-course corrections along the way based on your honest evaluation of how the process is going.  It’s a lot like competing.  If you’re not hitting, find out why and make adjustments.  If your kicks or shots hook to the left all the time, change.
    • In recruiting, if you’re not getting the interest of college coaches on your target list, make changes to solve that issue.  If coaches start contacting your son or daughter but for some reason a number of the relationships die, make adjustments to revive the relationships or strengthen the ones you do have.
  • Vision.  This is important.  Vision brings inspiration, energy and action.  If you get lost in the weeds of recruiting, it’s time to climb a mountain and take a look at the bigger picture.  You should start the recruiting process with goals and an overall vision.  What’s the big win at the end of the process?  That’s the vision.

I guarantee you’ll have ups and downs in this crazy recruiting process, but clear vision will help you make it through.  As an individual and as a family.

The Big Question

Are you ready to move out and make this a Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough?  I’ll be leading you through the  process this summer through my blog, podcast and webcasts.  If you’re ready to take the summer recruiting challenge, tell me and I’ll pray for and lead your family this summer.

Let’s make the 90 days of summer count big-time as you set your goals, define your strategy and excel at execution.

How to Get Recruited in 30 Days Free Report Button

High school footballLet’s think about something together.

If you could get your son or daughter on multiple college coaches’ radars this summer, how would you feel?

Relieved … joyful … empowered … hopeful … confident?

If you could do one thing, what would you do to guarantee your son or daughter gets recruited this summer?

 

  • Produce a video and post it on BeRecruited or on another recruiting site?Women's basketball
  • Get your athlete to the top three camps?
  • Complete the online recruiting forms at 15 schools you have identified as your top choice programs?
  • Have your son or daughter call five coaches a week to personally express interest in their programs?

Remember, I’m asking you to narrow it down to one thing that would guarantee your student-athlete gets recruited this summer.

That’s a tough choice, isn’t it?  But it really does make you think.

Everything I’ve listed is valid, but not one of these is the right thing to do if you want to guarantee your son or daughter gets recruited… this summer!

Recruiting Checklist

Continue reading

NashvilleWhen you think of baseball, what states come to mind?  Certainly not the home state of the defending NCAA Champion Vanderbilt baseball team.  Understand that Tennessee is not a baseball breeding ground like Florida, California, Arizona, Mississippi and several other states.  However, this team won the College World Series last year.

As I thought about what it takes to be a champion, my mind goes to thinking about what it takes to be a scholarship athlete.  And believe me, it’s a lot more than talent.

Given that talent must be present, here are three more qualities of scholarship athlete.  I’ve talked with a number of college coaches over the years, and they are looking beyond the talent to the person. Continue reading

BaseballI was thinking about some of the big questions parents and athletes ask me about what it takes to get an athletic scholarship. Most people know so little about it.

I was there once, when I was working on getting my sons recruited.  But over the years, I’ve become an expert who has helped thousands of other families.

I can’t give all the answers in one post, but I can give you one:  hard work.

For example, I was reading about Lindsay Brown, who accepted a scholarship offer for volleyball. She had interestVolleyball from several schools, including New Hampshire, Oregon State, Louisiana Tech, Lewis & Clark College, Dominican University, Menlo College, UC Santa Barbara and UC Riverside. She chose Sonoma State, which is near her home town. Continue reading

FootballAthletic scholarships don’t just happen, although it sure looked that way a few days ago on signing day.  I want to dispel that myth, because believing it will assure that your kid is left out in the cold and you’re left holding an entire college bill.

So let’s talk about what it takes to being selected for an athletic scholarship. There is a road and Softballyour family needs to know the checkpoints along that road.  If you do, and you act correctly, your kid will get signed to an athletic scholarship.

Consider it a long race.  It’s one that you have to be willing to run, because getting an athletic scholarship is a process.  It takes effort on your part as a family.  Most families wait around and lose out.  Don’t be one of those.

And don’t be scattered.  That’s another mistake families make.  The end result is frustration and no real progress.  Confusion reigns.

The families I work with that are successful are ones that follow a step-by-step system.  And it always includes the chronological checkpoints I will lay out for you in this post.

Let’s go! Continue reading

Jon Fugler, scholarship coachIn all the years I’ve been involved in recruiting, first as a parent and then as a recruiting coach, it is crystal clear that getting a scholarship involves three investments and three great returns.

The first investment is time.  You need to be willing to invest the time it takes to pursue an athletic scholarship. For our family, the investment yielded enormous returns.  I’m talking about both the parent and the athlete investing time.

Here are three things you must do with your time in order to capture an athletic scholarship:

  1. Pursue college coaches.  Sounds strange?  Aren’t they the ones doing the recruiting?  Yes, but if you don’t show interest, they’ll move on to the next recruit.  Build the relationships with key college coaches.  These are coaches are showing an interest in you.  Relationships take time.
  2. Keep the resume up to date.  Parents, your kid’s athletic and academic history is growing and changing every season or semester.  Be sure to take the time to go through the resume and make sure it is completely up to date.  I recommend doing this every month.  Coaches will want to see your latest information.  You’d be surprised how often that needs updating.
  3. Improve. Yes, athlete, you’ve got to be improving continuously.  Practice more, compete more, find a mentor to challenge and teach you.  Keep in mind, that other recruits are working hard to improve, and you don’t want to be left behind.

The second investment is money.  There is no free ride to get a free ride. Whether you pursue the scholarship on your own or go Cadillac with a consultant or service, you will have to invest money. Recruiting resources, camps, clinics, trips, showcases, video production, etc.

However, make wise investments.  You can go broke at this.  Don’t get caught up in activity, such as attending camp after camp.  Do it strategically, attending recruiting camps at colleges you’re interested in.  You want to be seen by the right coaches.  Parents, I would budget for 3-4 camps over the entire recruiting effort– period.

The third investment is heart.  This is not a process for the weak of heart. It’s a long haul and it can wear you out. But the rewards are well worth it. Don’t lose heart. Commit your heart to the process.

That’s why it is important not to go at it alone.  This is a team effort– parent and athlete.  you’re going to need each other.  Remember, this is a marathon and not a sprint.  Just like a season, you’ll have ups and downs and good and bad stretches.  Keep the end in mind– winning an athletic scholarship.  You’ve got to have a vision.

Continue reading

Final Four 2016I’m in Houston this week.  Unfortunately, I’m leaving Saturday morning at 5:30, when all the Final Four fans arrive.

What comes to mind is the number of high school athletes that make their school choice based on who they see on TV in the big games. Parents, you know what I’m talking about.

When you consider a college education is one of the biggest choices your family will ever make, it’s important to have more to go on than watching teams on TV.  You may have to convince your student-athlete about that.

Talk to your kid about the better way of making his or her hot list of schools. Remind them that the #1 priority is to find the best fit, or match, in the end.   Let’s look at four key matches to consider and discuss.

Academic match

This is first because your kid is a student-athlete.

Your list should include schools that have your kid’s area of academic interest.  This isn’t a hard and fast rule, because their interests are likely to change after they are in school for a year or two.  But a good starting point are schools that have majors that fit their interests.

As for me, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to study going into college.  I started in communications and ended up in radio and TV.  I knew I didn’t want to pursue engineering or science, so that narrowed it down to liberal arts.  That may be all you have to go on at this point, and that’s fine.

On the other hand, if your son or daughter has strong interests in a certain major or area, be sure to take that into account when you build your list of prospective schools.

Athletic match

Can your kid compete at the schools on his or her radar?  This is important, because you don’t want to put a lot of effort into programs that are way above their talent level, and you don’t want to shoot for ones that are way below.  You want to find the sweet spot. Go after those schools that are a good match.

This is where it’s important to open your son or daughter’s eyes to good institutions they’ve never considered.  As a parent, your role kicks in here.  Do some research and get a wider variety of schools on your kid’s radar.

The athletic match also includes the dynamics of coaching staff.  You won’t know this until you meet the coaches, but have this factor on your radar.

Aspirational match

I’m talking about your kid’s desires and dreams. What’s important to him or her in a college?  You should consider athletics, academics, college life, location, etc.  Listen to what your student-athlete has to say. Take note.  You may understand more than they do what their aspirations are.  As they verbalize those aspirations, they’ll get clarity, too.

Anecdotal match

What stories are coming out of the programs on your list?  You may not hear anything in the early going, but the more you get to know a coach and program, you should hear some stories that give you a better picture about the program and institution.

Ask other athletes in the program.  Talk to students there.  If you know other people who have gone to that school, talk with them.  Get as much information as you can from what others have to say about their experience.

When your kid hears these stories, how does he feel?  Is he attracted to the school or not?  While not a scientific evaluation, this can really help the “gut feeling” about a school.

And so…

I’m one who urges my families to cast your net wide.  Don’t come up with a short list out of the gate.  So, while I’m encouraging you to develop your list from the four keys above, don’t limit your choices early on.  Use these guidelines throughout the recruiting process, especially as you narrow down your choices.

Recruiting phone callIt could come as a phone call, email, letter or even a text. Your kid has been contacted by a college coach.  This coach is recruiting your son or daughter for an athletic scholarship. You might be feeling an adrenaline rush when this happens.

You ask yourself, “What should we do?”

Here are some words of advice:

1. Stay calm. This is just a first contact. You haven’t been offered a scholarship yet.  It’s important to realize that the coach is beginning the recruiting process with your son or daughter and there is a long road ahead.  It may or may not work out.  That’s what you are trying to find out and the coach is trying to find out.

Welcome the contact.  If the coach asks for more information, provide it promptly.  Send or email documents and video link if that’s what is asked for. Continue reading

College basketballYou could call this a showcase blog post.  It’s the kind of post that hits the prime things any family needs to know about recruiting.  If you’re just getting started in the journey, this is the post you need to read. 

If you’ve been at it for a while, this is the kind of post you need to re-read.  It’s getting back to basics when your efforts get scattered.  In fact, I was re-focused when I wrote this.  It reminded me about staying true north.

As always, feel free to write me with thoughts or questions.

 

Need to Know #1: When to Start

The number one question I get from parents is, “When should we start the recruiting process?”Athletic scholarship questions

I remember getting an email from one parent whose son was a senior, asking if it was too late. A moment later, I received an email from a freshman parent asking if it was too early!

Just this week, a parent wrote me, “We have twin daughters.  They are only freshmen in high school.  Is it too early to start the process?”

So, as you can see, there is some confusion out there.

You should start early. In fact, as early as the freshman year, if that’s possible.

But, even if you start in the senior year, it’s still probably not too late. You just have to work faster.  Of course, this late in the year you really need to hustle.  You need to apply the five steps I teach and do it fast.  Now back to the subject at hand… Continue reading

workoutDo you get “Aha!” moments when you’re working out?  I mean, when your head is clear and good ideas sometimes flow in?  Say “yes.”  It will make me feel better.

Here’s the “Aha!” moment I had recently while I was working out, and it involves you.

I’m going to reveal to you the secret to getting recruited by college coaches.

I’ve been presenting “the five steps to an athletic scholarship” for years, but often it falls on deaf ears.  It has had me perplexed, because what I share are the step-by-step actions a family needs to take to get an athletic scholarship.  Seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it?

What’s even more frustrating is that it works for families who apply the five sequential steps!  Frustrating because I know most families are missing out because they don’t apply the steps.

“Why don’t more families do it?”

I’m glad you asked.  Here’s why… Continue reading

TrackThe athletic scholarship world can be confusing.  Once you start down the recruiting road, you get bombarded with options and opportunities.  As you may have experienced, it’s hard to know what advice to follow and what options to pursue.  And which advice is just plain bad.

The window of opportunity is limited.  No matter what year your athlete is in, he or she only has so much time to get on coaches’ radar, get recruited, and then get scholarship offers.  You have to make the most of the time.

Here are three red flags to watch out for on your scholarship journey.

1.  Consultants or services that make scholarship promises.  No one can ever guarantee that your son or daughter will get a scholarship.  Outright promises or strong suggestions to this end should set off alarms in your head.  Avoid these people.

Instead, get honest evaluations of your kid’s talent.  College coaches will tell you if you ask.  The problem is that most parents don’t want to know the truth deep down inside.  I know.  I’ve been there.  We believe our kids are better than they are, or we underestimate their talent.  Either extreme is bad.  An honest evaluation will tell you what level your athlete performs at.   You’ll have a better idea of where he or she can compete and use their talents.

You want the program and school that are the best fit athletically, academically and in college life.  There are more factors than just money when it comes to choosing a school.

Continue reading

Thanks for the rBasketball arenaecruiting and athletic scholarship questions you’ve presenting lately.  These are questions many parents and student-athletes are wrestling with, so I thought I’d dig into a couple more in this post.

Q: “My daughter and I would like to attend local D2 tournaments games in our area. I know we can’t approach the D2 coaches, so how do we make contact with them? Send a email stating her interest in the school and that she will be in attendance watching the game? Will my daughter be allowed to hand a coach her player profile while at the game? Your thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you.”

A: The nice thing about recruiting is that the contact rules apply to coaches.  The parent and student-athlete can make contact with the coaches anywhere and anytime.  You can visit a school, meet with the coach, tour the campus, deliver information, etc.

The same is true for attending these tournament games.  Yes, your daughter can go and approach the coach.  However, it may not be very effective at the game itself.  The coach is “in the zone” before and during the game.  The best time to approach the coach is after the game.  She can hand the player profile to the coach then, but I would also highly recommend sending the complete Introductory Packet by mail or email.  A coach has a lot on his or her mind during competition.

I think it is a good idea what you have planned.  She’ll make an impression on the coach that will make a difference when he or she gets the Intro Packet from your daughter. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballI receive a lot of questions from student-athletes and parents when it comes to recruiting and scholarships.  I remember when I was going through the process with my twin sons, and I had a lot of questions, too.  Here are a couple I’ve received that have risen to the top.  I thought it would be helpful to post them and respond to them, because you may be asking  similar questions.

Q:  I play varsity doubles and have received all-state for 2 years, but it seems very hard to get noticed at the regional/national level in doubles. Any suggestions?

A:  Your struggle is not an uncommon problem for most high school athletes. Even talented ones like yourself get overlooked. Most colleges’ recruiting budgets are limited, and the coaches cannot get out to see that many players. They rely on tournaments, showcases and camps to see large numbers of players at once. Only for exceptional prospects will a coach normally travel to see an individual game or match.

For these reasons, it is extremely important that you take the initiative to let college coaches know about you. Be aggressive in pursuing the schools where you have an interest. Once you make contact with the coaches, you open the door for continued contact. They will write back if they see that you have the tools to play on their team. Your letter, player profile, completed questionnaire, video (if they ask for one), and regular updates are those tools. Continue reading

Jon and Noonie FuglerMy wife is an expert when it comes to recruiting.  You see, she had as much of a role as I did in getting our twin sons their fully paid educations.

So it’s time you heard from her.  She’s my featured, exclusive, expert guest on the latest episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.

We tackle a topic I’m passionate about:  The Role of Parents in Recruiting.  Instead of listening to me go on and on, I decided to bring Noonie onto the microphone and get her perspective as a mom.

At the end of the interview, I’ll leave you with some takeaways from what she said and what I’ve learned as well.  You’ll hear some principles that you can put into practice right away.  As a result…

ONE:  You’ll strengthen your relationship with your son or daughter.

TWO:  You’ll have a smoother path to an athletic scholarship for your kid.

THREE: You’ll diminish or eliminate some of the stresses in this pursuit.

Listen, learn and apply!

NCAANational signing day is Wednesday.  It’s a day that gets an incredible amount of hype.  It elevates many but discourages more.

If your kid isn’t an elite athlete, national signing day can leave you cold, worried, anxious.  Of course, tomorrow is just football’s big day, but this kind of hype can send chills down the spines of parents whose athletes compete in other sports.

Why?

Because the air of uncertainty creeps into your mind and emotions.  What if my kid doesn’t land a scholarship?  What if all our effort isn’t rewarded?  What if we can’t afford college unless my son or daughter gets a scholarship?  What if…? Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesFor a high school student-athlete, there aren’t many things more frightening than talking with a college coach on the phone. It can be daunting. And it should be. You’ve been dreaming of getting an athletic scholarship and now the coaches are calling. You’re on the spot.

You need to prepare for these occasions. Once you take a few calls, you’ll get more comfortable. That is, until you get a call from a coach you really want to play for. This school is on your A list. You’ve been hoping he or she will call. And now it happens. It can really make you nervous.

When taking a coach’s call, try to relax. He or she will understand you’re nervous. That’s ok.

Secondly, have a list of questions ready. If the coach is calling your cell phone, you’ll have to think quickly. The list will have to be in your head. Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastJUST RELEASED:  The new episode of The Athletic Scholarship Podcast:  10 Questions Parents Ask — And the Answers. Over the years, I’ve received some great recruiting questions from parents, so I thought I’d start the new year answering 10 of the most common ones.  The answers should help you wherever you are in your scholarship journey.  Listen now.

 

Jon at Ghana market

Open air market I visited on my trip to Ghana.

I was in Ghana, West Africa last week and a high school athlete approached me.  He was a soccer player, of course, or “football” as it is known there.

I was at one of the tourist attractions in the country and he was walking up to all of us to raise money to buy new uniforms for his high school team.  He told me that someday he’d be a star and I would see him on TV.  This boy had a dream.   In a country where the average wage is $3 a day and people are struggling to make a living, he still had a dream.

I think about the high school athletes in this country.  How much are our kids willing to work to achieve their athletic dreams?  How much will they sacrifice to do what it takes to be recruited and get a scholarship?  It takes a lot of work.

Compared to the boy I met in Ghana, kids in the U.S. have it real good.  The basics of life are provided for and the standard of living is way beyond $3 a day.  Our kids compete on travel teams, go to to tournaments regularly, have excellent facilities, go to week-long sports camps and often enjoy nice hotels when they do travel.  I’m not saying every high school athlete has these benefits, but it’s prevalent across the country.

My point is that we need to count our blessings.  Student-athlete, you have a platform to be one who gets recruited and get a scholarship.   Combine that with your athletic ability and you’ve got a shot at it.  You’re miles ahead of a kid in a country that has little opportunity.  But so many of them make the most of their opportunities and pursue their dreams.  Even if it means approaching strangers at a tourist attraction and ask for sponsors for his uniform.

Based on the blessings you have, what will you do today in your pursuit of an athletic scholarship?

I’m praying that this will be a landmark year for parents and high school athletes around the world.  Are you hopeful for your son or daughter’s scholarship chances?

2016

As we start this year, I want to share a few words with parents.  I’ll give you three things you must do and three things not to do in 2016.  Follow these words of advice and you’ll make this year count.

The end result is that you’ll be miles ahead of other families on the road to an athletic scholarship.  These things are based on the results of thousands of families I’ve worked with over the years.

Three things you must do:

ONE: Encourage your athlete.   Teen-agers are emotional (obviously).   They can also be up and down athletically depending on the quality of their latest performance.  And they can get discouraged when this recruiting thing isn’t going the way they had hoped.  As a parent, you need to be their best fan and encourager.

Most of all, you need to bring perspective to the table.  Help your son or daughter see these emotional checkpoints as moments in time.  Walk with them through their pain and help them come out on the other side.   Recognize the pain and discouragement and bring them the words that will keep them going towards their athletic scholarship dream. Continue reading

10 Recruiting questionsHere are 10 of the top questions parents are asking about athletic scholarships.  As we close out 2015 and turn the calendar to the new year, I hope the answers to these questions will keep you pointed in the right direction.

Before we get into them, I want to remind you that my free Recruiting Mini-Course will take you step-by-step through the things you need to do in 2016.  I encourage you to watch this three-part video tutorial.

And now, here are the questions:

ONE:  What’s included in an athletic scholarship?   It depends on the offer, but a scholarship can range from a full ride to a portion of a student-athlete’s college expenses.  Your kid may be offered tuition, or room and board, or books, or a combination of these things.  Each sport has a limit on the number of scholarships it can offer, so the coach has to divide the dollars between the scholarship athletes.

TWO:  How do I get my kid noticed by college coaches?  The most important thing is to take the initiative.  Don’t wait for college coaches to find your son or daughter, because it probably won’t happen.  Sure, the elite athletes get discovered easily.  However, in most cases, kids need to take the first step in order to get the attention of college coaches.  What you should do is put together and send a good, short introductory packet that makes a good first impression on coaches at the schools you have interest in.  You’ll be surprised how this simple step can produce amazing results.

THREE:  Are athletic scholarships guaranteed for four years?  No.  Scholarships are usually awarded year-to-year, although the NCAA allows multi-year offers.  If a student-athlete performs poorly, he can lose his scholarship the next year.  Behavior and grades are other factors that can affect an athlete’s scholarship renewal.  It is important to read the language of the scholarship agreement and ask questions.

[Special Note:  I wanted to alert you to the $60 Off Sale on any Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Check it out.  Sale ends January 5.]

FOUR:  How common is a full-ride scholarship?  Full ride scholarships are only offered in “head count sports.”  The remainder of the sports are called “equivalency sports,” where coaches divide the scholarships among the scholarship athletes.   These athletes receive “partial scholarships.”  Full-ride sports at the D1 level are  football, men and women’s basketball, and women’s gymnastics, volleyball and tennis.

Continue reading

ChristmasFirst of all, Merry Christmas!  I hope your family will experience the joy of Jesus’ birth, God’s gift to a needy world.

I want to discuss three common roadblocks to an athletic scholarship and how to overcome them.  Then maybe your son or daughter will be a future success story.

Roadblock #1:  Lack of focus.   It’s amazing how much money parents will spend to try to get their kids an athletic scholarship.  It may start with less than a hundred dollars for a camp, but somewhere along the way it has escalated to thousands of dollars for multiple camps, tournament exposure, showcases, travel, consultants and services.

You can’t have a shotgun approach, thinking that the more you do the greater the chance for a scholarship.  It comes down to be strategically focused.  You’ll save your family time and money by mapping out your strategy and sticking with it.  Stay focused.  Beware of the voices of other parents and so-called experts who distract you and pull you in different directions. Continue reading

Going brokeYou can go broke trying to get your kid a scholarship, and that’s the opposite of what you’re after for your family. You want net gain, not net loss.

The amount of money parents spend on things that they think will guarantee or increase their kids’ scholarship chances is often based on emotion and not logic. What I’ve found is much of this money is spent out of fear or from peer pressure.

In its most recent survey of college pricing, the College Board reports that a “moderate” college budget for an in-state public college for the 2015–2016 academic year averaged $24,061. A moderate budget at a private college averaged $47,831.

Yes, when it comes to the end of the recruiting journey, you want $10,000 … $20,000 … $30,000 or more each year staying in your pocket! Parents, I know the financial strain of paying for college. But spending a ton of money on things you hope will get your kid a scholarship is no guarantee at all.

Here are three things you can do to spend less in your scholarship efforts and still be successful.

1. Cut back on lessons. I sent my kids to hitting and pitching lessons, and paid quite a bit. But I was selective. It wasn’t an “until further notice” contract with the instructor. Be strategic. I would bet that you could cut your costs in half and still not sacrifice your kid’s future and improvement. You could save hundreds, even thousands, of dollars a year. Continue reading

2015The sun is setting on 2015.  The calendar will soon turn to 2016 and gasps will go out among student-athletes and parents. It’s January already! It’s 2016! How did that happen?

I want you to be successful and I’m going to lay out something that will make success a reality.

The reality of the ticking clock will hit a lot of families on January 1. I don’t want you to be caught getting behind in your scholarship pursuit. I don’t want you to miss opportunities.

I remember the turning point for our family was the week between Christmas and New Years. That’s when we met Jeff. We sat down across the table from him in a Southern California restaurant. You see, Jeff was our mentor. Without Jeff, we wouldn’t have made it. He led our family through the whole process, which resulted in a fully paid education at my boys’ school of choice. Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastI’m just a couple days away from releasing the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.  This time, you’ll get the benefit of hearing from a college coach who has been recruiting at some of the nation’s leading programs for two decades.

Here are three things he pushed during the interview.  I’ll only give you a cursory view here,  because I want you to hear the details in his own words.   Be sure to check back on my podcast page in a couple days for the release of this new episode.

  1.  Do your research.  This coach made a  big point about visiting the schools highest on your list and spending time on campus, with the coach, and watching the team work out.  This would be an unofficial visit, and you can make as many of those as you want.
  2. Academics is so important.  If you don’t have the grades, the coach can’t get you in. So work hard now so you can have a choice of schools when it’s time to make your decision.
  3. The scholarship offer is not the most important factor in your decision.  So what is most important?  This coach will talk in more detail about this in the interview.

Continue reading

Congratulations to Karina Diaz, the winner of a $75 Sports Authority Gift Card.  She entered the contest during the Grand Opening of Athletic Scholarship University.  Karina, this is a good way to start the Christmas season!

Women's basketballIf you’re a talented athlete, you’re blessed.  You have to realize that not everyone is talented.  Your talent is something that you may take for granted, but this Thanksgiving I encourage you to give thanks to the good Lord who gave it to you.

In fact, take an athletic inventory.  What sets you apart from your competitors?  Think details.  Height, weight, speed, certain skills.

Then take an inventory of your accomplishments.  Think back over the past year or two and list what you’ve done.

Say a big “Thank You” for all these things.  You are a unique individual with a set of talents and accomplishments that no one else possesses.  Never take that for granted.  Then… Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsYou can get duped by believing things that just aren’t true.  And in the recruiting world, this can kill your athletic scholarship.

I just finished recording the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast, and I spoke passionately about three of the most damaging myths.  Then I lay out the truth.  The podcast will release in a couple days, but here’s a sneak preview:

Myth #1:  If my kid is good enough, college coaches will find him or her.

Truth: A very small percentage of high school student-athletes receive scholarships because the coach “happened to find him or her.” Only the top-line elite athletes—the top 100 or so nationally—receive enough national media recognition that they are automatically recruited without having to make an effort. Continue reading

VolleyballRecruiting is a hard world, and if you don’t have your act together, it can beat you up.  Here are the first three of a dozen recruiting rules that I’ve laid out for families.  I hope these three help.  You can get the full dozen (and three bonus rules!) by downloading the Guide I’ve put together.

Download “12 Rules of Recruiting and Athletic Scholarships”

Recruiting Rule #1:  Know When to Start. 

The number one question I get from parents is, “When should we start the recruiting process?”

I remember getting an email from one parent whose son was a senior, asking if it was too late. A moment later, I received an email from a freshman parent asking if it was too early! So, as you can see, there is some confusion out there.

You should start early. In fact, as early as the freshman year, if that’s possible. But, even if you are in the senior year, it’s still probably not too late. You just have to work faster. Continue reading

Tomorrow night is my premier webinar and you’re invited:

5 Step to an Athletic Scholarship:  How to Get Recruited in 30 Days.

I’ll be walking you through the five steps that will give you the focus and direction your family needs in this exciting and challenging journey.  I don’t know where you’re at in the process, but I do know that you’ll come away from this webinar with solid steps of action.  When we did the recruiting thing with our sons, it was a huge blessing to have someone guide us and give us specific steps of action.  You’ll get that tomorrow night.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

9 PM Eastern/ 8 PM Central/ 7 PM Mountain/ 6 PM Pacific

My Video Invite to You

If you follow just the first two steps, your student-athlete will start hearing from coaches in 30 days or less.

How to Watch

This high-energy live video event will be presented on the LIVE WEBINAR PAGE , as well as on YouTube and Google Hangouts. Choose your way.

Watch on your computer or any mobile device. If you’re using your mobile device, you may want to watch on YouTube.

RSVP

Please RSVP by emailing me or on the Event Page and I’ll see you Thursday night, November 5. Invite other parents and athletes to attend.

Everyone attending will receive a Recruiting Checklist as a follow-up to what I teach you on the webinar.

To watch on Google Hangouts, follow this link:

https://plus.google.com/events/cgr7tavvgukf6qimdj54157avu4

#1It’s great book.  It’s a #1 best seller.  It’s called The One Thing and it has transformed the way I approach my projects in life and work.

And it can help you in big ways in your scholarship pursuit.

Gary Keller, founder of the biggest real estate company in America, is the author.  So, considering his success, I thought it was worth reading.  What I learned from him is something I want to pass along to you.

I’ll be digging more deeply into this in Thursday’s podcast and in the upcoming Webinar next week, but I want to lay the groundwork for you here so you can get your head around what he advises.  And you can start applying it right away.

It will change the results you’re getting in recruiting.  It will put you head and shoulders above other families.  It will get you to your goal.  Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsRecruiting can be a mess.

How’s that for an opening line?  Well, it’s true and sometimes I just need to say it.  It’s so confusing that parents and athletes are left at the starting line while the clock keeps ticking on a kid’s high school career.

How about you?  Are you confused or discouraged?  Have you been spinning your wheels or fallen into a ditch?  Or has your experience been pretty good, even excellent?  Share your experience in the comment section below.  Other parents can benefit from what you have to say.  And I’d like to know what you’re dealing with.

This quote is from a Forbes article earlier this month:

“A lot of kids think they’re being recruited, when they really aren’t,” said Kimberly Oden, a former Stanford volleyball player who now advises high-school students and their families on college-sports possibilities. Coaches may send out 150 form letters to possible prospects, Oden noted. Most of those early feelers go nowhere.

News like this is tragic. Parents and athletes are under false impressions, and as I said, the clock keeps ticking.  Yet, nothing happens.

This isn’t news to me.  I’ve seen it for years.  But I am at the point where I just have to do more about this.  I am stepping up my game so families can step up theirs.

Here’s what I mean. Continue reading

High school footballHow can you be sure you’re doing the right things in your athletic scholarship pursuit?  You may be getting input from friends, coaches, blogs, books, paid services and consultants, not to mention everything you read all over the Internet.

What’s true and what’s not?  It’s a big issue, and I address this and four other points in the premier episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.

You’ll come away with action steps in the areas of who, what, how, where and when.

The featured question in this episode comes from Bill, “One of the toughest things that we face as coaches and parents, is that we are in a small rural farm community with not a lot around us. Our record is not the greatest, and when you add all of this together, college coaches do not come visit or recruit at our school. How do we get these coaches to reach out to us and our kids?”  Jon answers this question.

BaseballI also shares my personal story and the story of my twin sons who succeeded in getting a fully paid education and competing at the school of their choice.  I’ll explain how they got there and the lessons our family learned.  Lessons you can take to heart, too.

Listen to the podcast.

BallsI’ve been looking around and no one has done it, so I decided I would.  I’m launching the Athletic Scholarship Podcast in a couple days. In the first episode, I’m starting with a couple stories.  My story and your story.  I want you to hear my experiences over the years and how they might translate into yours.

I want to help you with your story from this day forward.  That’s what the Athletic Scholarship Podcast is all about.

In the first episode, I dig into five things that will help you avoid pain, disappointment and financial disaster.  I thought I’d preview the first one here with you in writing.

#1: WHO.

Be careful who you listen to.  There’s so much bad advice out there and it can cost you.  Not only financially, but your son or daughter’s future.  Their college future is too important to mess with, and you need to be careful.

You can get a lot of information online, but how good is it?  Just because the website looks good doesn’t mean you should believe the content.  I say that even for the things you read on my site.  Verify, verify, verify.  Check the information against what you see, read, and hear elsewhere.  If there’s consistency, then it’s likely that the advice is valid. Continue reading

Jon FuglerSo many families have asked some great questions about recruiting and athletic scholarships, and I’ve been listening. As a result, I’m thrilled to announce a brand new resource that will answer those questions and go beyond what you’ve expressed or imagined.

This is something that I’ve had on my plate for over a year, and it will make its debut in the next two weeks. I’ll be addressing the biggest issues in recruiting and scholarships when I debut the “Athletic Scholarship Podcast.” It’s the only podcast of its kind.

Podcasting is becoming one of the fastest growing digital tools for learning and gathering information on your terms. It’s on demand so it’s on your schedule. This regular audio vault will get right to the heart of what you need to know and do as your family pursues an athletic scholarship. Continue reading

Basketball in hoopGetting an athletic scholarship isn’t all about the money.  Parents and student-athletes can let their pride get in the way of the best choice.  They put the scholarship offer at the top of the list and the kid ends up at a college and program that aren’t the best fit.

In my case, I transferred after just one year.  I really enjoyed my first choice, the University of Minnesota.  But it wasn’t the best fit athletically or academically.

I have to admit that I transferred to Indiana University for athletic reasons, but other factors fell into place to make IU the best fit overall.  I’m glad for my Minnesota experience, but I’m thrilled for my Indiana experience.

I could have saved myself and my parents a lot of stress and expense had I known then what I know today. Continue reading

QuestionsHow can you be sure you’re getting the right advice when you’re in the recruiting process?

That’s an important question, because you may be hearing as many voices as we heard when we got involved with our sons.  You hang around other parents and athletes, you read books, blogs, websites and talk to reps from services.  There’s a lot of information out there, and it’s not all right.

In fact, I’d expect you to check me out before believing everything I say.  That’s the right thing to do.

Here’s some things you can do to make sure you’re getting the right information.

  • Look for consistency.  If you’re checking websites, talking with other people and reading books and blogs, then see what advice is consistent.  That’s probably the truth.  In fact, you can spot wrong information by comparing it against consistent information from a number of other sources.  In other words, if something stands out, it is probably wrong.
  • Talk with college coaches.  That’s right.  Try to connect with a few and see what they have to say.  I’ve done quite a few college coach interviews over the years and have learned tons from them.  You see, these are the people you want to impress, so hear what they have to say in your recruiting approach.  It may take several phone calls and some visits (the latter is better), but if you work at it you’ll get some good information.
  • Talk with other families.  Find out what’s working for them.  If it’s working for them, it is likely to work for you.  Especially talk with families whose kids have gotten scholarships.  You know that they did some things right.  Model their approach.

I know these are not the how-to’s spelled out for you.  But you should take the initiative to check things out.

I don’t want to promote myself, but I do want to give you access to three resources that do spell things out clearly.  First the Athletic Scholarship Free Mini-Course.  It’s packed with a lot of info and practical steps.  It will be a good benefit.

Second, read the Parent’s Guide to Athletic Scholarships.  If you haven’t downloaded it, you can do it now.  (See the sign-up on the left).

Third, view this video blog post that will help you in your journey to do the right things.

I hope these help clarify some things in your recruiting efforts towards your athletic scholarship dream.