Academics

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When we were parents on the scholarship trail for our twin sons, we didn’t have the resources that are available today.

For instance, college websites weren’t as complete as they are now.  I don’t think Facebook existed.  We really had to dig.  We needed personal conversations with coaches and administrative staff to really get a picture of that school.  Today, you’ve got just about everything at your fingertips. Continue reading

Journey(Summer Recruiting Breakthrough Sale has begun.  Get $80-$100 off a Recruit-Me Premium purchase).

On this first day of summer, reality hits.

The major recruiting season is underway.  The next 60 days can be the road to an athletic scholarship.  The challenge is to stay on the road and not slide off the shoulder.

Let me share three things that you’ll need to do this summer to stay on the scholarship road.  Don’t get sidetracked and end up in the ditch.

You see, if you can keep your son or daughter disciplined this summer, it will yield huge benefits.  Athletic, academic and financial.

#1: Get out of the garage. The summer will pass you by if you don’t get started.  There’s a tendency to take it easy in the summer but recruiting doesn’t go on vacation in June, July and August.  If you stay in “park,” you’ll be left in the dust by other families that realize that summer is golden for recruiting. Continue reading

Athletic scholarship successAny great athlete or coach enters a season with a plan.  Without it, the season would be a disaster.  In fact, a coach would be deemed foolish if he or she didn’t map out the season, set goals, define strategy and then begin executing.

The great coach Mike Krzyzewski said, “There are a lot of people who want to win, but winners prepare to win.”

So my question to you as summer kicks off, “Is your family prepared to win an athletic scholarship?”

“I’d like to…”  “I hope…”  and “I want to…” are not phrases that tell me you’re confident you’ll get an athletic scholarship.  As a parent, you’re part of this process and your confidence level is key.  As an athlete, it’s obvious that your confidence is critically important.

I will make sure recruiting happens for your family this summer.  Are you ready for a wild ride?  You’ll be in a great position by fall when several coaches are in contact with your son or daughter and your athlete is on their radar.

This is your Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough I’m looking for 100 families who will get serious enough about the recruiting process that they’ll dedicate this summer to making it happen.  And make it happen with a plan that has goals, strategy and execution.

If you’re one of these 100 families, be prepared to dedicate your time and energy to this, and to act wisely.  I’m willing to set you on course and make sure the athlete in your family gets recruited this summer– the beginning of a successful journey to an athletic scholarship.If you’re one of those families, read this post and begin taking action.  Devour it.  Devour my latest podcast, too, because it will set you up for summer.

This is your campaign

You’ve got to have the perspective that recruiting is a series of events over a long period of time.  It’s not once and for all.  A coach doesn’t just discover your son or daughter and then it’s all done.

If you don’t like the word “campaign” (and many don’t this year), then use the word “season.”  Recruiting is a season in your family’s life.  Sunny days, rainy days, easy days, hard days.  Long days, short days.  Oh, there are so many factors in recruiting that will knock you around.  So be prepared.

Since it is a season, let’s talk about the plan, getting back to what I started with in this post.

First…

…set your goals and state them.  Here are some examples:

  • Long-term:  Jenny will receive three solid offers by spring of her senior year.
  • One-year:  Terry will have 10 coaches looking at him seriously by this time next year.
  • Short-term:  Fifteen coaches will contact Andy by July 15, 2016.

I believe you should have goals in each of those categories.  In fact, state more goals at other intervals, such as “By the end of fall season…” or “By the beginning of senior year…”

Goals are critical.  And as a sports family, you should be able to nail down these goals.  You can add performance goals to these, as well.  And academic goals.  Goals give you targets and rails to run on.

Your assignment:  Take time as a parent(s) and athlete and get away for a working session… this week!  Time is flying by, so get these goals spelled out early.

Remember, these are not cast in stone.  The purpose of the goals are to give you something tangible to shoot at and drive your actions.  These goals can change, and they will.  I saw a journal in the store yesterday, with the title, “Make Mistakes.”  It’s alright to set and re-set goals as time goes on.

Second…

… define your strategy.  You’ve got goals, but a well-defined strategy has to be in place next.  Here’s the hard work and much of it is unknown at this point.  But there are things you have to nail down in this process.  Such as…

  • In what ways will we take the initiative to get on coaches’ radars this summer?  Map out the how.  Put the actions into your calendar so you are accountable to yourselves.
  • Which schools are at the top of our list (please have at least 10)?  We will get the contact information for each coach by June 10.
  • Plan one week this summer when you can visit 2-3 schools nearby to get the feel for college campuses.  Make an appointment with the coaches and staff in admissions.  Choose these schools even if you don’t have a keen interest there.  The purpose is to see a college campus, experience meeting with a coach without pressure, and spend time in the academic area.
  • Research the following:  (1) How to put together a dynamite intro packet, (2) How to produce a quality video, (3) How to interview a college coach, (4) NCAA recruiting rules and recruiting calendars.

Third…

… execute your strategy.  In his book Chess Not Checkers, Mark Miller lays out four elements to success in business.  The fourth one certainly applies to athletics:  Excel at Execution. 

This applies to winning an athletic scholarship.  A written strategy isn’t worth the iPad it’s written on unless it is followed by committed execution.  Execution that excels.

Your athlete may excel at running, shooting, hitting or kicking.  Well, it’s time to excel at executing your recruiting strategy.

That requires three things– at least:

  • Discipline.  You’ve got to stay at it.  This is not a short-haul effort.  You’ve got a carefully thought-out strategy and blueprint written out.  Stick with it for the long haul.
  • Evaluation.  How’s your strategy and execution doing?  Make mid-course corrections along the way based on your honest evaluation of how the process is going.  It’s a lot like competing.  If you’re not hitting, find out why and make adjustments.  If your kicks or shots hook to the left all the time, change.
    • In recruiting, if you’re not getting the interest of college coaches on your target list, make changes to solve that issue.  If coaches start contacting your son or daughter but for some reason a number of the relationships die, make adjustments to revive the relationships or strengthen the ones you do have.
  • Vision.  This is important.  Vision brings inspiration, energy and action.  If you get lost in the weeds of recruiting, it’s time to climb a mountain and take a look at the bigger picture.  You should start the recruiting process with goals and an overall vision.  What’s the big win at the end of the process?  That’s the vision.

I guarantee you’ll have ups and downs in this crazy recruiting process, but clear vision will help you make it through.  As an individual and as a family.

The Big Question

Are you ready to move out and make this a Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough?  I’ll be leading you through the  process this summer through my blog, podcast and webcasts.  If you’re ready to take the summer recruiting challenge, tell me and I’ll pray for and lead your family this summer.

Let’s make the 90 days of summer count big-time as you set your goals, define your strategy and excel at execution.

How to Get Recruited in 30 Days Free Report Button

NashvilleWhen you think of baseball, what states come to mind?  Certainly not the home state of the defending NCAA Champion Vanderbilt baseball team.  Understand that Tennessee is not a baseball breeding ground like Florida, California, Arizona, Mississippi and several other states.  However, this team won the College World Series last year.

As I thought about what it takes to be a champion, my mind goes to thinking about what it takes to be a scholarship athlete.  And believe me, it’s a lot more than talent.

Given that talent must be present, here are three more qualities of scholarship athlete.  I’ve talked with a number of college coaches over the years, and they are looking beyond the talent to the person. Continue reading

BaseballI was thinking about some of the big questions parents and athletes ask me about what it takes to get an athletic scholarship. Most people know so little about it.

I was there once, when I was working on getting my sons recruited.  But over the years, I’ve become an expert who has helped thousands of other families.

I can’t give all the answers in one post, but I can give you one:  hard work.

For example, I was reading about Lindsay Brown, who accepted a scholarship offer for volleyball. She had interestVolleyball from several schools, including New Hampshire, Oregon State, Louisiana Tech, Lewis & Clark College, Dominican University, Menlo College, UC Santa Barbara and UC Riverside. She chose Sonoma State, which is near her home town. Continue reading

FootballAthletic scholarships don’t just happen, although it sure looked that way a few days ago on signing day.  I want to dispel that myth, because believing it will assure that your kid is left out in the cold and you’re left holding an entire college bill.

So let’s talk about what it takes to being selected for an athletic scholarship. There is a road and Softballyour family needs to know the checkpoints along that road.  If you do, and you act correctly, your kid will get signed to an athletic scholarship.

Consider it a long race.  It’s one that you have to be willing to run, because getting an athletic scholarship is a process.  It takes effort on your part as a family.  Most families wait around and lose out.  Don’t be one of those.

And don’t be scattered.  That’s another mistake families make.  The end result is frustration and no real progress.  Confusion reigns.

The families I work with that are successful are ones that follow a step-by-step system.  And it always includes the chronological checkpoints I will lay out for you in this post.

Let’s go! Continue reading

Final Four 2016I’m in Houston this week.  Unfortunately, I’m leaving Saturday morning at 5:30, when all the Final Four fans arrive.

What comes to mind is the number of high school athletes that make their school choice based on who they see on TV in the big games. Parents, you know what I’m talking about.

When you consider a college education is one of the biggest choices your family will ever make, it’s important to have more to go on than watching teams on TV.  You may have to convince your student-athlete about that.

Talk to your kid about the better way of making his or her hot list of schools. Remind them that the #1 priority is to find the best fit, or match, in the end.   Let’s look at four key matches to consider and discuss.

Academic match

This is first because your kid is a student-athlete.

Your list should include schools that have your kid’s area of academic interest.  This isn’t a hard and fast rule, because their interests are likely to change after they are in school for a year or two.  But a good starting point are schools that have majors that fit their interests.

As for me, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to study going into college.  I started in communications and ended up in radio and TV.  I knew I didn’t want to pursue engineering or science, so that narrowed it down to liberal arts.  That may be all you have to go on at this point, and that’s fine.

On the other hand, if your son or daughter has strong interests in a certain major or area, be sure to take that into account when you build your list of prospective schools.

Athletic match

Can your kid compete at the schools on his or her radar?  This is important, because you don’t want to put a lot of effort into programs that are way above their talent level, and you don’t want to shoot for ones that are way below.  You want to find the sweet spot. Go after those schools that are a good match.

This is where it’s important to open your son or daughter’s eyes to good institutions they’ve never considered.  As a parent, your role kicks in here.  Do some research and get a wider variety of schools on your kid’s radar.

The athletic match also includes the dynamics of coaching staff.  You won’t know this until you meet the coaches, but have this factor on your radar.

Aspirational match

I’m talking about your kid’s desires and dreams. What’s important to him or her in a college?  You should consider athletics, academics, college life, location, etc.  Listen to what your student-athlete has to say. Take note.  You may understand more than they do what their aspirations are.  As they verbalize those aspirations, they’ll get clarity, too.

Anecdotal match

What stories are coming out of the programs on your list?  You may not hear anything in the early going, but the more you get to know a coach and program, you should hear some stories that give you a better picture about the program and institution.

Ask other athletes in the program.  Talk to students there.  If you know other people who have gone to that school, talk with them.  Get as much information as you can from what others have to say about their experience.

When your kid hears these stories, how does he feel?  Is he attracted to the school or not?  While not a scientific evaluation, this can really help the “gut feeling” about a school.

And so…

I’m one who urges my families to cast your net wide.  Don’t come up with a short list out of the gate.  So, while I’m encouraging you to develop your list from the four keys above, don’t limit your choices early on.  Use these guidelines throughout the recruiting process, especially as you narrow down your choices.

TrackThe athletic scholarship world can be confusing.  Once you start down the recruiting road, you get bombarded with options and opportunities.  As you may have experienced, it’s hard to know what advice to follow and what options to pursue.  And which advice is just plain bad.

The window of opportunity is limited.  No matter what year your athlete is in, he or she only has so much time to get on coaches’ radar, get recruited, and then get scholarship offers.  You have to make the most of the time.

Here are three red flags to watch out for on your scholarship journey.

1.  Consultants or services that make scholarship promises.  No one can ever guarantee that your son or daughter will get a scholarship.  Outright promises or strong suggestions to this end should set off alarms in your head.  Avoid these people.

Instead, get honest evaluations of your kid’s talent.  College coaches will tell you if you ask.  The problem is that most parents don’t want to know the truth deep down inside.  I know.  I’ve been there.  We believe our kids are better than they are, or we underestimate their talent.  Either extreme is bad.  An honest evaluation will tell you what level your athlete performs at.   You’ll have a better idea of where he or she can compete and use their talents.

You want the program and school that are the best fit athletically, academically and in college life.  There are more factors than just money when it comes to choosing a school.

Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballI receive a lot of questions from student-athletes and parents when it comes to recruiting and scholarships.  I remember when I was going through the process with my twin sons, and I had a lot of questions, too.  Here are a couple I’ve received that have risen to the top.  I thought it would be helpful to post them and respond to them, because you may be asking  similar questions.

Q:  I play varsity doubles and have received all-state for 2 years, but it seems very hard to get noticed at the regional/national level in doubles. Any suggestions?

A:  Your struggle is not an uncommon problem for most high school athletes. Even talented ones like yourself get overlooked. Most colleges’ recruiting budgets are limited, and the coaches cannot get out to see that many players. They rely on tournaments, showcases and camps to see large numbers of players at once. Only for exceptional prospects will a coach normally travel to see an individual game or match.

For these reasons, it is extremely important that you take the initiative to let college coaches know about you. Be aggressive in pursuing the schools where you have an interest. Once you make contact with the coaches, you open the door for continued contact. They will write back if they see that you have the tools to play on their team. Your letter, player profile, completed questionnaire, video (if they ask for one), and regular updates are those tools. Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesFor a high school student-athlete, there aren’t many things more frightening than talking with a college coach on the phone. It can be daunting. And it should be. You’ve been dreaming of getting an athletic scholarship and now the coaches are calling. You’re on the spot.

You need to prepare for these occasions. Once you take a few calls, you’ll get more comfortable. That is, until you get a call from a coach you really want to play for. This school is on your A list. You’ve been hoping he or she will call. And now it happens. It can really make you nervous.

When taking a coach’s call, try to relax. He or she will understand you’re nervous. That’s ok.

Secondly, have a list of questions ready. If the coach is calling your cell phone, you’ll have to think quickly. The list will have to be in your head. Continue reading

I’m praying that this will be a landmark year for parents and high school athletes around the world.  Are you hopeful for your son or daughter’s scholarship chances?

2016

As we start this year, I want to share a few words with parents.  I’ll give you three things you must do and three things not to do in 2016.  Follow these words of advice and you’ll make this year count.

The end result is that you’ll be miles ahead of other families on the road to an athletic scholarship.  These things are based on the results of thousands of families I’ve worked with over the years.

Three things you must do:

ONE: Encourage your athlete.   Teen-agers are emotional (obviously).   They can also be up and down athletically depending on the quality of their latest performance.  And they can get discouraged when this recruiting thing isn’t going the way they had hoped.  As a parent, you need to be their best fan and encourager.

Most of all, you need to bring perspective to the table.  Help your son or daughter see these emotional checkpoints as moments in time.  Walk with them through their pain and help them come out on the other side.   Recognize the pain and discouragement and bring them the words that will keep them going towards their athletic scholarship dream. Continue reading

10 Recruiting questionsHere are 10 of the top questions parents are asking about athletic scholarships.  As we close out 2015 and turn the calendar to the new year, I hope the answers to these questions will keep you pointed in the right direction.

Before we get into them, I want to remind you that my free Recruiting Mini-Course will take you step-by-step through the things you need to do in 2016.  I encourage you to watch this three-part video tutorial.

And now, here are the questions:

ONE:  What’s included in an athletic scholarship?   It depends on the offer, but a scholarship can range from a full ride to a portion of a student-athlete’s college expenses.  Your kid may be offered tuition, or room and board, or books, or a combination of these things.  Each sport has a limit on the number of scholarships it can offer, so the coach has to divide the dollars between the scholarship athletes.

TWO:  How do I get my kid noticed by college coaches?  The most important thing is to take the initiative.  Don’t wait for college coaches to find your son or daughter, because it probably won’t happen.  Sure, the elite athletes get discovered easily.  However, in most cases, kids need to take the first step in order to get the attention of college coaches.  What you should do is put together and send a good, short introductory packet that makes a good first impression on coaches at the schools you have interest in.  You’ll be surprised how this simple step can produce amazing results.

THREE:  Are athletic scholarships guaranteed for four years?  No.  Scholarships are usually awarded year-to-year, although the NCAA allows multi-year offers.  If a student-athlete performs poorly, he can lose his scholarship the next year.  Behavior and grades are other factors that can affect an athlete’s scholarship renewal.  It is important to read the language of the scholarship agreement and ask questions.

[Special Note:  I wanted to alert you to the $60 Off Sale on any Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Check it out.  Sale ends January 5.]

FOUR:  How common is a full-ride scholarship?  Full ride scholarships are only offered in “head count sports.”  The remainder of the sports are called “equivalency sports,” where coaches divide the scholarships among the scholarship athletes.   These athletes receive “partial scholarships.”  Full-ride sports at the D1 level are  football, men and women’s basketball, and women’s gymnastics, volleyball and tennis.

Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastI’m just a couple days away from releasing the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.  This time, you’ll get the benefit of hearing from a college coach who has been recruiting at some of the nation’s leading programs for two decades.

Here are three things he pushed during the interview.  I’ll only give you a cursory view here,  because I want you to hear the details in his own words.   Be sure to check back on my podcast page in a couple days for the release of this new episode.

  1.  Do your research.  This coach made a  big point about visiting the schools highest on your list and spending time on campus, with the coach, and watching the team work out.  This would be an unofficial visit, and you can make as many of those as you want.
  2. Academics is so important.  If you don’t have the grades, the coach can’t get you in. So work hard now so you can have a choice of schools when it’s time to make your decision.
  3. The scholarship offer is not the most important factor in your decision.  So what is most important?  This coach will talk in more detail about this in the interview.

Continue reading

Congratulations to Karina Diaz, the winner of a $75 Sports Authority Gift Card.  She entered the contest during the Grand Opening of Athletic Scholarship University.  Karina, this is a good way to start the Christmas season!

Women's basketballIf you’re a talented athlete, you’re blessed.  You have to realize that not everyone is talented.  Your talent is something that you may take for granted, but this Thanksgiving I encourage you to give thanks to the good Lord who gave it to you.

In fact, take an athletic inventory.  What sets you apart from your competitors?  Think details.  Height, weight, speed, certain skills.

Then take an inventory of your accomplishments.  Think back over the past year or two and list what you’ve done.

Say a big “Thank You” for all these things.  You are a unique individual with a set of talents and accomplishments that no one else possesses.  Never take that for granted.  Then… Continue reading

Basketball in hoopGetting an athletic scholarship isn’t all about the money.  Parents and student-athletes can let their pride get in the way of the best choice.  They put the scholarship offer at the top of the list and the kid ends up at a college and program that aren’t the best fit.

In my case, I transferred after just one year.  I really enjoyed my first choice, the University of Minnesota.  But it wasn’t the best fit athletically or academically.

I have to admit that I transferred to Indiana University for athletic reasons, but other factors fell into place to make IU the best fit overall.  I’m glad for my Minnesota experience, but I’m thrilled for my Indiana experience.

I could have saved myself and my parents a lot of stress and expense had I known then what I know today. Continue reading

IcebergGetting recruited isn’t magic.  Coaches don’t just show up at your doorstep, or at your games, meets or matches.

However, most parents don’t realize this.  They don’t see what goes on behind the scenes to get the attention of college coaches.  That has to be frustrating.

Picture an iceberg.  What you see above the surface is minute compared to what’s below the surface.  That’s why a mighty cruise ship can be destroyed by running into an iceberg.  But you knew that.

In recruiting, there’s a lot that goes on below the surface to attract the attention of college coaches.  Let me run a few by you.

1.  Moving towards coaches.  Don’t wait for them to find your son or daughter.  Take an aggressive stand and get your athlete’s name out there.  Letters, emails, phone calls, camp appearances are all ways that y0u can get the coaches to take notice.  Continue reading

[NOTE:  Five Steps to an Athletic Scholarship, a Free Mini-Course from Recruit-Me, will be available in just a few days.  This is the only step-by-step course available today and will expand on some of the things in this blog post, as well as much more.  Check back in a few days and you’ll see how to get started with the first lesson.]

Signing Most people don’t understand the process that gets an athlete recruited.  The official signing is what most of us see or hear about, but we have no idea what went into getting the student-athlete in that position.

Is it a big mystery?  To most families, it is.  So let me lay out five factors that cause an athlete to get recruited:

1.  Talent.  There’s no substitute for this.  But don’t be fooled.  Your son or daughter doesn’t need to be the best in the league or on the team.  They key is that he or she has the talent to compete at the next level.  If that’s the case, there’s a good chance a scholarship is in their future.  It’s important to cast your net wide, because you don’t know which programs are looking for recruits at your son or daughter’s talent level.  Don’t get hung up on particular schools at the outset.  It will take time to see which ones are the best fit. Continue reading

There are some important websites that will help you in your scholarship pursuit. I’d like to recommend five of them for you to bookmark and check on a regular basis.

NCAA1. NCAA. Of course, this is the daddy of them all, and it’s well worth checking regularly. They have news that often pertains to recruiting, and a number of resource pages within the site.  One of these pages is the recruiting calendar.

2. NAIA.  The NAIA is an association of schools throughout the country which have similar recruiting rules, but some key differences.  One difference is that a recruit can actually work out with the team Continue reading

A pounding hail storm that turned in to a steady rain halted any chance of me recording a video post today, so we’ll have to cover the material the old-fashioned way.  Well, I did shoot an 18-second video with my phone, but it has nothing to do with recruiting.  Check out the hail:

 

This week, I have a tough question for you to answer.

You are probably in one of three situations.

1.  You’ve been pursuing an athletic scholarship for your son our daughter for some time.  Maybe a year or more.  And you’re not sure how it will all turn out.

2.  You’ve been working on this for a very short time.  You’ve done some things, but coaches aren’t knocking the door down.

3.  You’re just getting started in the scholarship pursuit. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballIt’s November 1.  Do you have a 60-day recruiting plan?

“What’s that?” you ask.

Scholarships don’t happen.  Parents, you need to lead your son or daughter in the recruiting process.  It starts with a plan.

I challenge you to establish a 60-day plan, which will carry you through the end of the year.  This is a good time to do that, with the year-end as your finish line.  Your finish line to an athletic scholarship?  No, your next yard-marker.

Here are some things that you need to include in your 60-day plan: Continue reading

RunnerYou’d like to gain ground in your scholarship efforts this Fall, and that’s a good thing.  I want you to get closer to your scholarship, too.

This is an important season in the recruiting calendar.  Here are three things you can do right away to maximize the Fall recruiting season:

1.  Cast a wide net.  How big is your prospective list of schools?  If it is less than 40, it’s too small.  Whether you’re getting started now or you’ve been at it for a while, you need to expand your list to 40 prospective schools so you can pursue a relationship with the coaches from those programs.

You might be saying,  “I’m being recruited by some schools.  Why do I need more?”  You just never know where things will land, and you need to have as many recruiting relationships as possible.  There are other schools you don’t yet have on your list that will be your top choices a few months from now. Continue reading

I surveyed parents aSurveynd student-athletes earlier this month, and the responses were insightful.  From goals to needs, many people expressed their honest thoughts.  I’m thankful for the detailed responses.  Let me give you a peek at some trends I saw in the responses, then I’ll address them.

Let me start at the beginning.

The first thing that popped out to me was the goal student-athletes expressed.  By far, the most frequent answer was “A full ride scholarship.”  That’s great, because you have a clear goal, the highest scholarship goal when it comes to financial help.  Several others stated they wanted a partial or 50% scholarship. Continue reading

FootballFor many high school athletes, they make their college choice for the wrong reasons.  Here are my top 5 wrong reasons for choosing a particular program:

1.  My father (or mother) went there.

2.  They’re my favorite team.

3.  I like the campus. Continue reading

Marathon runnersI’ve always told our Recruit-Me families that the scholarship pursuit is not a sprint.  It’s a marathon. And if you’re in your freshman or sophomore year of high school, it’s like running multiple marathons.  For that reason, you can lose your enthusiasm and energy.  Discouragement can set in when things don’t happen as fast as you’d like.

That’s normal.

But do everything you can to fight that discouragement.  A marathon runner hits the wall and winners run through that wall.  Finish the course.  Stay with it.  Keep moving along, step by step.  Here’s a pivotal approach you can take.  Leaders in life know this and that’s why they are leaders: Continue reading

Cell phoneIn my last post, I went through a number of questions athletes should ask college coaches when the coaches call.  Or when you call a coach.  Recruiting is a two-way street.  While the coach is recruiting athletes, you are recruiting schools.  You should take the initiative to find out as much as you can about the program, coach and school.  That way you can make an informed decision.  Let’s continue from last week’s discussion.

College Life

What is a typical day for a student-athlete?
You will learn a typical schedule that will include courses, practices, meal times, study times, etc. This will give you insight as to how to manage your time and assist you with needed adjustments.

What does the institution’s services entail?
You will be informed of any study hall hours that may be required of you during your tenure. Also, this is a good time to ask about the availability of tutors. Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesFor a high school student-athlete, there aren’t many things more frightening than talking with a college coach on the phone.  It can be daunting.  And it should be.  You’ve been dreaming of getting an athletic scholarship and now the coaches are calling.  You’re on the spot.

You need to prepare for these occasions.  Once you take a few calls, you’ll get more comfortable.  That is, until you get a call from a coach you really want to play for.  This school is on your A list.  You’ve been hoping he or she will call.  And now it happens.  It can really make you nervous.

When taking a coach’s call, try to relax.  He or she will understand you’re nervous.  That’s ok.

Secondly, have a list of questions ready.  If the coach is calling your cell phone, you’ll have to think quickly.  The list will have to be in your head.  Continue reading

FacilitiesI read a fantastic article published by the NCAA and I wanted to share it with you.  The author lists 10 benefits athletes receive by competing in sports in college.  Whether you receive a scholarship or not, you can receive some of the benefits.  Parents and athletes alike will be pleased by what you read in this article.

The first three benefits are:

1.  A college education.  This seems obvious, but you’d be surprised how many high school students never go to college.  A college degree has a direct impact on a person’s quality of life.

2.  Academic success.  The NCAA’s most recent data indicate that more than eight out of 10 (82 percent) Division I student-athletes are earning their degrees.

3.  Scholarships.  More than 150,000 student-athletes receive $2.7 billion in athletic scholarships each year from NCAA member colleges and universities.

For the complete article and some surprising information, continue reading.

Athletic scholarshipLike most people, I doubt you have time to listen to a one-hour podcast on recruiting.  Many did last week, but if you weren’t one of them, then here are the cliff notes for you to take in — and hopefully apply.

Here are the top seven questions that come up when I’m talking with people about recruiting and athletic scholarships, followed by bullet point answers:

1. How can I get noticed and recruited?

• Myth: Coach will find you.

• Take the initiative. Don’t wait for coaches to contact you.

• The fallacy that top line athletes are the only ones who get contacted.

• Most scholarships are awarded to athletes that make the first contact.

$15 off coupon• Coaches do not have the budget to travel the country or even much of the region.

• First impression usually comes from an athlete that contacts a coach. Continue reading

D1 SchoolsSo you want an athletic scholarship?  

If you’re serious about it, then you have to be serious about your academics… now.  There is a strong tie between academics and your likelihood to get an athletic scholarship.  In other words, your grades and your choice of classes count.

Specifically, here’s what the NCAA says:

To participate in Division I athletics or receive an athletics scholarship for the first year of college, a student-athlete must:

-> Complete the 16 core-course requirement in eight semesters:

  1. 4 years of English
  2. 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  3. 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by the high school)
  4. 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical science
  5. 2 years of social science
  6. 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy)

-> Earn a minimum required grade-point average in core courses
-> Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches the core course grade-point average and test-score sliding scale. (For example, a 3.000 core-course grade-point average needs at least a 620 SAT).

Student-athletes enrolling in college in August 2016 and later must meet all of the above requirements to receive aid in the first year and practice in the first term. In order to compete in the first year, prospects must meet all of the above and:

  1. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in core courses
  2. Meet an increased sliding-scale standard
  3. Complete 10 core-courses prior to the start of the seventh semester, at least seven in English, math and science.
  4. If a student-athlete earns nine credits in the first term, he or she can continue to practice the remainder of the year. If not, he or she can remain on aid but can’t practice.

For more details visit the NCAA website.