NCAA

College campusThe words of this college coach still ring in my ears.

“Visiting schools speaks loudly to college coaches.”

I probed further with this experienced D1 coach and he went on to tell me why.  And I thought that as fall approaches, this would be good for you to know.

We’re not talking about official visits.  You get five of those, paid for by the program.  Obviously, if your family has a genuine interest in the program, your athlete should make the official visit.  But remember the five-visit limit.  Five official visits.

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This month, receive almost $100 off your Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Take action on your fall recruiting efforts now– at a huge discount.

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But you can make as many unofficial visits as you want.  And you should do that generously, especially with schools in your state or region– where there is a sincere interest.

Let’s look at the difference between an official and unofficial visit.  The NCAA states: Continue reading

NCAADon’t get caught without knowing the rules.

Whether you’re getting started on the recruiting scene or you’ve been at it for awhile, there are more rules than you can to keep track of.  Fortunately, the burden is on the coaches to abide by the rules.

However, it’s especially good to be familiar with the recruiting calendar, because it will affect your expectations.

“Why aren’t any coaches calling my kid?”  “When are we allowed to visit campuses?”

These are just a couple questions parents and athletes ask at one time or other.

The NCAA has a great resource page that answers the most-asked questions, especially about recruiting calendars.  And that’s the topic of this week’s post.

Recruiting Calendars

NCAA member schools have adopted rules to create an equitable recruiting environment that promotes student-athlete well-being. The rules define who may be involved in the recruiting process, when recruiting may occur and the conditions under which recruiting may be conducted.

Recruiting rules seek, as much as possible, to control intrusions into the lives of student-athletes.

The NCAA defines recruiting as “any solicitation of prospective student-athletes or their parents by an institutional staff member or by a representative of the institution’s athletics interests for the purpose of securing a prospective student-athlete’s enrollment and ultimate participation in the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program.”

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus.  A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

Continue reading

NCAANational signing day is Wednesday.  It’s a day that gets an incredible amount of hype.  It elevates many but discourages more.

If your kid isn’t an elite athlete, national signing day can leave you cold, worried, anxious.  Of course, tomorrow is just football’s big day, but this kind of hype can send chills down the spines of parents whose athletes compete in other sports.

Why?

Because the air of uncertainty creeps into your mind and emotions.  What if my kid doesn’t land a scholarship?  What if all our effort isn’t rewarded?  What if we can’t afford college unless my son or daughter gets a scholarship?  What if…? Continue reading

10 Recruiting questionsHere are 10 of the top questions parents are asking about athletic scholarships.  As we close out 2015 and turn the calendar to the new year, I hope the answers to these questions will keep you pointed in the right direction.

Before we get into them, I want to remind you that my free Recruiting Mini-Course will take you step-by-step through the things you need to do in 2016.  I encourage you to watch this three-part video tutorial.

And now, here are the questions:

ONE:  What’s included in an athletic scholarship?   It depends on the offer, but a scholarship can range from a full ride to a portion of a student-athlete’s college expenses.  Your kid may be offered tuition, or room and board, or books, or a combination of these things.  Each sport has a limit on the number of scholarships it can offer, so the coach has to divide the dollars between the scholarship athletes.

TWO:  How do I get my kid noticed by college coaches?  The most important thing is to take the initiative.  Don’t wait for college coaches to find your son or daughter, because it probably won’t happen.  Sure, the elite athletes get discovered easily.  However, in most cases, kids need to take the first step in order to get the attention of college coaches.  What you should do is put together and send a good, short introductory packet that makes a good first impression on coaches at the schools you have interest in.  You’ll be surprised how this simple step can produce amazing results.

THREE:  Are athletic scholarships guaranteed for four years?  No.  Scholarships are usually awarded year-to-year, although the NCAA allows multi-year offers.  If a student-athlete performs poorly, he can lose his scholarship the next year.  Behavior and grades are other factors that can affect an athlete’s scholarship renewal.  It is important to read the language of the scholarship agreement and ask questions.

[Special Note:  I wanted to alert you to the $60 Off Sale on any Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Check it out.  Sale ends January 5.]

FOUR:  How common is a full-ride scholarship?  Full ride scholarships are only offered in “head count sports.”  The remainder of the sports are called “equivalency sports,” where coaches divide the scholarships among the scholarship athletes.   These athletes receive “partial scholarships.”  Full-ride sports at the D1 level are  football, men and women’s basketball, and women’s gymnastics, volleyball and tennis.

Continue reading

2015The sun is setting on 2015.  The calendar will soon turn to 2016 and gasps will go out among student-athletes and parents. It’s January already! It’s 2016! How did that happen?

I want you to be successful and I’m going to lay out something that will make success a reality.

The reality of the ticking clock will hit a lot of families on January 1. I don’t want you to be caught getting behind in your scholarship pursuit. I don’t want you to miss opportunities.

I remember the turning point for our family was the week between Christmas and New Years. That’s when we met Jeff. We sat down across the table from him in a Southern California restaurant. You see, Jeff was our mentor. Without Jeff, we wouldn’t have made it. He led our family through the whole process, which resulted in a fully paid education at my boys’ school of choice. Continue reading

Tomorrow night is my premier webinar and you’re invited:

5 Step to an Athletic Scholarship:  How to Get Recruited in 30 Days.

I’ll be walking you through the five steps that will give you the focus and direction your family needs in this exciting and challenging journey.  I don’t know where you’re at in the process, but I do know that you’ll come away from this webinar with solid steps of action.  When we did the recruiting thing with our sons, it was a huge blessing to have someone guide us and give us specific steps of action.  You’ll get that tomorrow night.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

9 PM Eastern/ 8 PM Central/ 7 PM Mountain/ 6 PM Pacific

My Video Invite to You

If you follow just the first two steps, your student-athlete will start hearing from coaches in 30 days or less.

How to Watch

This high-energy live video event will be presented on the LIVE WEBINAR PAGE , as well as on YouTube and Google Hangouts. Choose your way.

Watch on your computer or any mobile device. If you’re using your mobile device, you may want to watch on YouTube.

RSVP

Please RSVP by emailing me or on the Event Page and I’ll see you Thursday night, November 5. Invite other parents and athletes to attend.

Everyone attending will receive a Recruiting Checklist as a follow-up to what I teach you on the webinar.

To watch on Google Hangouts, follow this link:

https://plus.google.com/events/cgr7tavvgukf6qimdj54157avu4

BallsI’ve been looking around and no one has done it, so I decided I would.  I’m launching the Athletic Scholarship Podcast in a couple days. In the first episode, I’m starting with a couple stories.  My story and your story.  I want you to hear my experiences over the years and how they might translate into yours.

I want to help you with your story from this day forward.  That’s what the Athletic Scholarship Podcast is all about.

In the first episode, I dig into five things that will help you avoid pain, disappointment and financial disaster.  I thought I’d preview the first one here with you in writing.

#1: WHO.

Be careful who you listen to.  There’s so much bad advice out there and it can cost you.  Not only financially, but your son or daughter’s future.  Their college future is too important to mess with, and you need to be careful.

You can get a lot of information online, but how good is it?  Just because the website looks good doesn’t mean you should believe the content.  I say that even for the things you read on my site.  Verify, verify, verify.  Check the information against what you see, read, and hear elsewhere.  If there’s consistency, then it’s likely that the advice is valid. Continue reading

NCAAWhat’s the #1 question you wish you could ask to college coaches about recruiting?

Now’s the time to ask it and get a candid answer.

I’m about ready to start a series of college coach audio interviews and I’ll include your question in one of more of my interviews.   Once I have the audios produced I’ll make them available in my upcoming new podcast, in my blog, and more completely inside Athletic Scholarship University.

There’s no reason to walk in the dark when it comes to getting clear information from the people your son or daughter needs to have an impact on.  I hear from a number of parents who have some good questions.  I can give my answers, but there’s nothing like hearing from coaches themselves.  I think it will save you a lot of time and money as you go through the recruiting process.

So go ahead and write your question in the comments section below and I’ll bring it to the coaches.  Then I’ll let you know when I’ll be posting their answers. Continue reading

[NOTE:  The Athletic Scholarship Mini-Course is now open!  To learn the five steps to an athletic scholarship, I invite you to get started by registering for the free Mini-Course and watching the first video.  This course is a must for any family pursuing an athletic scholarship.  The course is designed for parents and is just three lessons.]

TrackSummer is going to end soon, and my question for you is this, “What are you going to do to be ahead of the competition this fall?”

I’m not talking about your son or daughter’s athletic competition, but I’m talking about competition for an athletic scholarship.  If you’ve seen the calendar turn to August and the urgency has hit you, that’s a good thing.

These are urgent times.  The recruiting world is highly competitive, and you need to be proactive as a team with your son or daughter.  If you’ve followed me at all, you know that I’m the guy who pushes you to get in the game.  Don’t wait for college coaches to contact your son or daughter.  It may never happen.

First, as I said up top, make sure you’re going through my free Athletic Scholarship Mini-Course I opened yesterday.  It’s a jump-start opportunity.  You go at your own speed and you can start today, right now, by registering and watching the first video lesson.  This is a 3-part Mini-Course and I teach each 20-30 minute lesson.  This is a slam dunk.  You and your student-athlete need to get registered for this online course.  Do it and you’ll be miles down the road in just one week. Continue reading

There are some important websites that will help you in your scholarship pursuit. I’d like to recommend five of them for you to bookmark and check on a regular basis.

NCAA1. NCAA. Of course, this is the daddy of them all, and it’s well worth checking regularly. They have news that often pertains to recruiting, and a number of resource pages within the site.  One of these pages is the recruiting calendar.

2. NAIA.  The NAIA is an association of schools throughout the country which have similar recruiting rules, but some key differences.  One difference is that a recruit can actually work out with the team Continue reading

After Tuesday night’s teleseminar, honestly, I was exhausted.  But it was such a good event, and I’ve gotten excellent feedback on it.  The free audio download is available through tomorrow night, March 31, so I encourage you to download and listen at your convenience.

Get “Five Steps to an Athletic Scholarship” Download

How can you do the recruiting process right if you don’t know the foundational truth?  In the video at the top of this post, I reveal that truth and give you a real-life example in one family’s successful recruiting experience.

In the video, I mention that I offered a free Recruiting Checklist to everyone on the call the other night.  This Checklist will help you go deeper into the recruiting experience and is a follow-up to the five steps you’ll hear on the teleseminar.  Listen to the download and you’ll find out how to receive the Checklist.

The free checklist and offers explained on the teleseminar expire tomorrow night (Tuesday) at midnight.  I hope you’ll capture the urgency to get your recruiting program into high gear this spring.

College campusWith twin sons on their way to college over a decade ago, my wife and I were facing the prospect of huge college debt.  Our daughter was already in college and we were stretched to the max.

If it weren’t for the scholarships our boys received, I think we’d still be paying off college debt.

You may be in a similar situation, so you know how important it is for you to pursue an athletic scholarship for your son or daughter.  In fact, your student-athlete doesn’t realize how important this is.  Continue reading

SurveyI just received this comment and question from a student-athlete.  His question is not uncommon, and his thoughts about his situation are not uncommon either.  I thought that his question was so important that I’d answer it here for you, too.

Q:  I’m going to be a Sophomore next year and I might go for Varsity football. I play quarterback and I’m almost 6’0.  I have good grades.  What do I have to do to get a scholarship to a D1 school? Where I live is a small town and our Division is D4, so it harder to get scouts to look at you and to get scholarships. I would do anything to get to a d1 school.  I always work hard and try to be the best that I could. What should i do?? Continue reading

(Before you get into this post, can I ask for your help?  If you haven’t responded yet, I’d like to get your response to a few questions in our Athletic Scholarship and Recruiting SurveyI’d like to know your what you’re thinking and experiencing.  I’ve gotten a lot of helpful responses in the past few days.  Thanks for adding your voice!)

One of the mRunnerost common questions I get from athletes and parents is, “When should we start?”

You’re asking the question of  “when is too early, when is too late, and when is just right?”

I recommend families start, ideally, in the athlete’s freshman year in high school.  But this rarely happens, so don’t get worried if you didn’t do that.  You can make up the time.  This is the year when, together, you want to look at possible good fits.  Research schools from both the academic and athletic standpoint.  Gather as much information as you can.

As schools rise to the surface, those are the ones you need to dig into further.  Find out as much as you can about the athletic programs and about the academic areas of interest.  I believe it is too early to contact schools because the coaches are looking at juniors and seniors that can help their programs in the near future. Continue reading

Although most athletic scholarships are one-year renewable scholarships, there is a move towards four-year guaranteed scholarships.  That’s good news for student-athletes.  According to the Indiana Business Journal, the Big Ten made a startling announcement late last month:Track

“The Big Ten Conference said [Tuesday] that it supports guaranteed four-year scholarships and improved medical coverage for its athletes.

“The league announced in a statement signed [Tuesday] by its 14 presidents that it proposes working within the NCAA structure to provide greater academic security for its athletes by guaranteeing scholarships for four years, even if an athlete can no longer compete or has left for a professional career. Athletic scholarships are typically awarded on a one-year renewable basis. Continue reading

FacilitiesI read a fantastic article published by the NCAA and I wanted to share it with you.  The author lists 10 benefits athletes receive by competing in sports in college.  Whether you receive a scholarship or not, you can receive some of the benefits.  Parents and athletes alike will be pleased by what you read in this article.

The first three benefits are:

1.  A college education.  This seems obvious, but you’d be surprised how many high school students never go to college.  A college degree has a direct impact on a person’s quality of life.

2.  Academic success.  The NCAA’s most recent data indicate that more than eight out of 10 (82 percent) Division I student-athletes are earning their degrees.

3.  Scholarships.  More than 150,000 student-athletes receive $2.7 billion in athletic scholarships each year from NCAA member colleges and universities.

For the complete article and some surprising information, continue reading.

NCAA ConferencesA question which comes up often regarding scholarships is, “How many scholarships are available?”  There are a number of ways to answer that, but I thought it would be helpful to look at how many there are per school per sport.   The following information is for the NCAA.

First of all, the data I want to share with you is the maximum allowable scholarships.  It all depends on funds available at that particular school as to whether the maximum is available for the program.   For instance, if a golf coach is not a good fundraiser, he or she may not be able to fulfill the maximum allowable scholarship limit.  It would be good to ask the coaches how many scholarships he or she has for their sport.  Continue reading

D1 SchoolsSo you want an athletic scholarship?  

If you’re serious about it, then you have to be serious about your academics… now.  There is a strong tie between academics and your likelihood to get an athletic scholarship.  In other words, your grades and your choice of classes count.

Specifically, here’s what the NCAA says:

To participate in Division I athletics or receive an athletics scholarship for the first year of college, a student-athlete must:

-> Complete the 16 core-course requirement in eight semesters:

  1. 4 years of English
  2. 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  3. 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by the high school)
  4. 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical science
  5. 2 years of social science
  6. 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy)

-> Earn a minimum required grade-point average in core courses
-> Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches the core course grade-point average and test-score sliding scale. (For example, a 3.000 core-course grade-point average needs at least a 620 SAT).

Student-athletes enrolling in college in August 2016 and later must meet all of the above requirements to receive aid in the first year and practice in the first term. In order to compete in the first year, prospects must meet all of the above and:

  1. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in core courses
  2. Meet an increased sliding-scale standard
  3. Complete 10 core-courses prior to the start of the seventh semester, at least seven in English, math and science.
  4. If a student-athlete earns nine credits in the first term, he or she can continue to practice the remainder of the year. If not, he or she can remain on aid but can’t practice.

For more details visit the NCAA website.

NCAA

This in from the NCAA–

The Division I Board of Directors has adopted adopted five new football recruiting rules, including one that will allow football coaches increased access to student-athletes in the summer. The measures are effective immediately for Football Bowl Subdivision schools.

The new rules emerged after months of research into recruiting issues identified by football coaches. That research included surveys of both student-athletes and coaches and was conducted by a subcommittee of the division’s Leadership Council.

The new rules:

  • Allow football student-athletes to participate in preparations for the season during an eight-week period each summer. Those weeks can include eight hours per week of required weight training and conditioning. Up to two of the eight hours can consist of film review. Student-athletes who participate in the summer activities must be enrolled in summer school or meet specific academic benchmarks. The model is similar to those adopted by men’s and women’s basketball in the last two years. Both the Football Bowl and Football Championship subdivisions supported this change.

Read more…

D1 SchoolsAlthough you don’t have to be an expert on everything to do with recruiting, it’s helpful to know some of the key terms.  This knowledge will help you as you move through the process.  Here’s my short list of terms:

Here are some basic terms to be familiar with as you move through your scholarship and recruiting journey.

Contact.  If a college coach has any in-person contact with a high school student-athlete or parent away from the college campus, and says anything more than “hello,” it is a contact. In addition, if a college coach has any contact with the student-athlete or parent at the athlete’s high school or any location where he is competing or practicing, that is also a contact.

Contact Period.  This is the period of time a coach is allowed to have an in-person contact with a student athlete or his/her parents on or off the college campus. The coach may also watch an athlete play or visit his/her high school during this period, may write or telephone, and have the athlete and parents visit the college campus. Continue reading