Student-athlete

Baseball

When we were parents on the scholarship trail for our twin sons, we didn’t have the resources that are available today.

For instance, college websites weren’t as complete as they are now.  I don’t think Facebook existed.  We really had to dig.  We needed personal conversations with coaches and administrative staff to really get a picture of that school.  Today, you’ve got just about everything at your fingertips. Continue reading

TrackI had a great conversation one night with a man who has dedicated his life to helping student-athletes land at the right school… with the right scholarship.  We agreed on a number of points:

1.  Unless you’re a Blue Chip athlete, you will likely not be “found” by college coaches.  You need to take your scholarship efforts into your own hands as a family and get out there to be seen by college coaches.  Not only that, but you must do the right things.  A shotgun approach to this will not work.  You’ll be disappointed.  You need to have a game plan, just like you do when you’re competing as an athlete. Continue reading

Track communicationIt’s been a good Recruiting Breakthrough Week. I’ve alerted you to a critical recruiting season that will happen over the next 60-90 days. Summer is huge, especially since all college sports will be out of season and the coaches are recruiting heavily.

I urge you–make this truly a Recruiting Breakthrough Week for your family. It leads to a Breakthrough Summer. Please don’t miss the golden opportunity.

Here’s your “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5.” It’s your last one and will indeed give you a recruiting edge this summer.

Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5: Track your communications with coaches with excellence. It pays off. Continue reading

Student-athleteIt’s Recruiting Breakthrough Week, an exciting and powerful week to launch your family into a game-changing summer. This is a prime recruiting season. Don’t let it pass you by.

Here’s your Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #4:

Take ownership of your recruiting process yourselves.

Because parents know so little about the ins and outs of recruiting, they are tempted to turn over control to an outside party. This can be detrimental to your son or daughter’s future. Continue reading

Athletic scholarship successAny great athlete or coach enters a season with a plan.  Without it, the season would be a disaster.  In fact, a coach would be deemed foolish if he or she didn’t map out the season, set goals, define strategy and then begin executing.

The great coach Mike Krzyzewski said, “There are a lot of people who want to win, but winners prepare to win.”

So my question to you as summer kicks off, “Is your family prepared to win an athletic scholarship?”

“I’d like to…”  “I hope…”  and “I want to…” are not phrases that tell me you’re confident you’ll get an athletic scholarship.  As a parent, you’re part of this process and your confidence level is key.  As an athlete, it’s obvious that your confidence is critically important.

I will make sure recruiting happens for your family this summer.  Are you ready for a wild ride?  You’ll be in a great position by fall when several coaches are in contact with your son or daughter and your athlete is on their radar.

This is your Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough I’m looking for 100 families who will get serious enough about the recruiting process that they’ll dedicate this summer to making it happen.  And make it happen with a plan that has goals, strategy and execution.

If you’re one of these 100 families, be prepared to dedicate your time and energy to this, and to act wisely.  I’m willing to set you on course and make sure the athlete in your family gets recruited this summer– the beginning of a successful journey to an athletic scholarship.If you’re one of those families, read this post and begin taking action.  Devour it.  Devour my latest podcast, too, because it will set you up for summer.

This is your campaign

You’ve got to have the perspective that recruiting is a series of events over a long period of time.  It’s not once and for all.  A coach doesn’t just discover your son or daughter and then it’s all done.

If you don’t like the word “campaign” (and many don’t this year), then use the word “season.”  Recruiting is a season in your family’s life.  Sunny days, rainy days, easy days, hard days.  Long days, short days.  Oh, there are so many factors in recruiting that will knock you around.  So be prepared.

Since it is a season, let’s talk about the plan, getting back to what I started with in this post.

First…

…set your goals and state them.  Here are some examples:

  • Long-term:  Jenny will receive three solid offers by spring of her senior year.
  • One-year:  Terry will have 10 coaches looking at him seriously by this time next year.
  • Short-term:  Fifteen coaches will contact Andy by July 15, 2016.

I believe you should have goals in each of those categories.  In fact, state more goals at other intervals, such as “By the end of fall season…” or “By the beginning of senior year…”

Goals are critical.  And as a sports family, you should be able to nail down these goals.  You can add performance goals to these, as well.  And academic goals.  Goals give you targets and rails to run on.

Your assignment:  Take time as a parent(s) and athlete and get away for a working session… this week!  Time is flying by, so get these goals spelled out early.

Remember, these are not cast in stone.  The purpose of the goals are to give you something tangible to shoot at and drive your actions.  These goals can change, and they will.  I saw a journal in the store yesterday, with the title, “Make Mistakes.”  It’s alright to set and re-set goals as time goes on.

Second…

… define your strategy.  You’ve got goals, but a well-defined strategy has to be in place next.  Here’s the hard work and much of it is unknown at this point.  But there are things you have to nail down in this process.  Such as…

  • In what ways will we take the initiative to get on coaches’ radars this summer?  Map out the how.  Put the actions into your calendar so you are accountable to yourselves.
  • Which schools are at the top of our list (please have at least 10)?  We will get the contact information for each coach by June 10.
  • Plan one week this summer when you can visit 2-3 schools nearby to get the feel for college campuses.  Make an appointment with the coaches and staff in admissions.  Choose these schools even if you don’t have a keen interest there.  The purpose is to see a college campus, experience meeting with a coach without pressure, and spend time in the academic area.
  • Research the following:  (1) How to put together a dynamite intro packet, (2) How to produce a quality video, (3) How to interview a college coach, (4) NCAA recruiting rules and recruiting calendars.

Third…

… execute your strategy.  In his book Chess Not Checkers, Mark Miller lays out four elements to success in business.  The fourth one certainly applies to athletics:  Excel at Execution. 

This applies to winning an athletic scholarship.  A written strategy isn’t worth the iPad it’s written on unless it is followed by committed execution.  Execution that excels.

Your athlete may excel at running, shooting, hitting or kicking.  Well, it’s time to excel at executing your recruiting strategy.

That requires three things– at least:

  • Discipline.  You’ve got to stay at it.  This is not a short-haul effort.  You’ve got a carefully thought-out strategy and blueprint written out.  Stick with it for the long haul.
  • Evaluation.  How’s your strategy and execution doing?  Make mid-course corrections along the way based on your honest evaluation of how the process is going.  It’s a lot like competing.  If you’re not hitting, find out why and make adjustments.  If your kicks or shots hook to the left all the time, change.
    • In recruiting, if you’re not getting the interest of college coaches on your target list, make changes to solve that issue.  If coaches start contacting your son or daughter but for some reason a number of the relationships die, make adjustments to revive the relationships or strengthen the ones you do have.
  • Vision.  This is important.  Vision brings inspiration, energy and action.  If you get lost in the weeds of recruiting, it’s time to climb a mountain and take a look at the bigger picture.  You should start the recruiting process with goals and an overall vision.  What’s the big win at the end of the process?  That’s the vision.

I guarantee you’ll have ups and downs in this crazy recruiting process, but clear vision will help you make it through.  As an individual and as a family.

The Big Question

Are you ready to move out and make this a Summer ’16 Recruiting Breakthrough?  I’ll be leading you through the  process this summer through my blog, podcast and webcasts.  If you’re ready to take the summer recruiting challenge, tell me and I’ll pray for and lead your family this summer.

Let’s make the 90 days of summer count big-time as you set your goals, define your strategy and excel at execution.

How to Get Recruited in 30 Days Free Report Button

NashvilleWhen you think of baseball, what states come to mind?  Certainly not the home state of the defending NCAA Champion Vanderbilt baseball team.  Understand that Tennessee is not a baseball breeding ground like Florida, California, Arizona, Mississippi and several other states.  However, this team won the College World Series last year.

As I thought about what it takes to be a champion, my mind goes to thinking about what it takes to be a scholarship athlete.  And believe me, it’s a lot more than talent.

Given that talent must be present, here are three more qualities of scholarship athlete.  I’ve talked with a number of college coaches over the years, and they are looking beyond the talent to the person. Continue reading

Final Four 2016I’m in Houston this week.  Unfortunately, I’m leaving Saturday morning at 5:30, when all the Final Four fans arrive.

What comes to mind is the number of high school athletes that make their school choice based on who they see on TV in the big games. Parents, you know what I’m talking about.

When you consider a college education is one of the biggest choices your family will ever make, it’s important to have more to go on than watching teams on TV.  You may have to convince your student-athlete about that.

Talk to your kid about the better way of making his or her hot list of schools. Remind them that the #1 priority is to find the best fit, or match, in the end.   Let’s look at four key matches to consider and discuss.

Academic match

This is first because your kid is a student-athlete.

Your list should include schools that have your kid’s area of academic interest.  This isn’t a hard and fast rule, because their interests are likely to change after they are in school for a year or two.  But a good starting point are schools that have majors that fit their interests.

As for me, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to study going into college.  I started in communications and ended up in radio and TV.  I knew I didn’t want to pursue engineering or science, so that narrowed it down to liberal arts.  That may be all you have to go on at this point, and that’s fine.

On the other hand, if your son or daughter has strong interests in a certain major or area, be sure to take that into account when you build your list of prospective schools.

Athletic match

Can your kid compete at the schools on his or her radar?  This is important, because you don’t want to put a lot of effort into programs that are way above their talent level, and you don’t want to shoot for ones that are way below.  You want to find the sweet spot. Go after those schools that are a good match.

This is where it’s important to open your son or daughter’s eyes to good institutions they’ve never considered.  As a parent, your role kicks in here.  Do some research and get a wider variety of schools on your kid’s radar.

The athletic match also includes the dynamics of coaching staff.  You won’t know this until you meet the coaches, but have this factor on your radar.

Aspirational match

I’m talking about your kid’s desires and dreams. What’s important to him or her in a college?  You should consider athletics, academics, college life, location, etc.  Listen to what your student-athlete has to say. Take note.  You may understand more than they do what their aspirations are.  As they verbalize those aspirations, they’ll get clarity, too.

Anecdotal match

What stories are coming out of the programs on your list?  You may not hear anything in the early going, but the more you get to know a coach and program, you should hear some stories that give you a better picture about the program and institution.

Ask other athletes in the program.  Talk to students there.  If you know other people who have gone to that school, talk with them.  Get as much information as you can from what others have to say about their experience.

When your kid hears these stories, how does he feel?  Is he attracted to the school or not?  While not a scientific evaluation, this can really help the “gut feeling” about a school.

And so…

I’m one who urges my families to cast your net wide.  Don’t come up with a short list out of the gate.  So, while I’m encouraging you to develop your list from the four keys above, don’t limit your choices early on.  Use these guidelines throughout the recruiting process, especially as you narrow down your choices.

Recruiting phone callIt could come as a phone call, email, letter or even a text. Your kid has been contacted by a college coach.  This coach is recruiting your son or daughter for an athletic scholarship. You might be feeling an adrenaline rush when this happens.

You ask yourself, “What should we do?”

Here are some words of advice:

1. Stay calm. This is just a first contact. You haven’t been offered a scholarship yet.  It’s important to realize that the coach is beginning the recruiting process with your son or daughter and there is a long road ahead.  It may or may not work out.  That’s what you are trying to find out and the coach is trying to find out.

Welcome the contact.  If the coach asks for more information, provide it promptly.  Send or email documents and video link if that’s what is asked for. Continue reading

workoutDo you get “Aha!” moments when you’re working out?  I mean, when your head is clear and good ideas sometimes flow in?  Say “yes.”  It will make me feel better.

Here’s the “Aha!” moment I had recently while I was working out, and it involves you.

I’m going to reveal to you the secret to getting recruited by college coaches.

I’ve been presenting “the five steps to an athletic scholarship” for years, but often it falls on deaf ears.  It has had me perplexed, because what I share are the step-by-step actions a family needs to take to get an athletic scholarship.  Seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it?

What’s even more frustrating is that it works for families who apply the five sequential steps!  Frustrating because I know most families are missing out because they don’t apply the steps.

“Why don’t more families do it?”

I’m glad you asked.  Here’s why… Continue reading

TrackThe athletic scholarship world can be confusing.  Once you start down the recruiting road, you get bombarded with options and opportunities.  As you may have experienced, it’s hard to know what advice to follow and what options to pursue.  And which advice is just plain bad.

The window of opportunity is limited.  No matter what year your athlete is in, he or she only has so much time to get on coaches’ radar, get recruited, and then get scholarship offers.  You have to make the most of the time.

Here are three red flags to watch out for on your scholarship journey.

1.  Consultants or services that make scholarship promises.  No one can ever guarantee that your son or daughter will get a scholarship.  Outright promises or strong suggestions to this end should set off alarms in your head.  Avoid these people.

Instead, get honest evaluations of your kid’s talent.  College coaches will tell you if you ask.  The problem is that most parents don’t want to know the truth deep down inside.  I know.  I’ve been there.  We believe our kids are better than they are, or we underestimate their talent.  Either extreme is bad.  An honest evaluation will tell you what level your athlete performs at.   You’ll have a better idea of where he or she can compete and use their talents.

You want the program and school that are the best fit athletically, academically and in college life.  There are more factors than just money when it comes to choosing a school.

Continue reading

Thanks for the rBasketball arenaecruiting and athletic scholarship questions you’ve presenting lately.  These are questions many parents and student-athletes are wrestling with, so I thought I’d dig into a couple more in this post.

Q: “My daughter and I would like to attend local D2 tournaments games in our area. I know we can’t approach the D2 coaches, so how do we make contact with them? Send a email stating her interest in the school and that she will be in attendance watching the game? Will my daughter be allowed to hand a coach her player profile while at the game? Your thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you.”

A: The nice thing about recruiting is that the contact rules apply to coaches.  The parent and student-athlete can make contact with the coaches anywhere and anytime.  You can visit a school, meet with the coach, tour the campus, deliver information, etc.

The same is true for attending these tournament games.  Yes, your daughter can go and approach the coach.  However, it may not be very effective at the game itself.  The coach is “in the zone” before and during the game.  The best time to approach the coach is after the game.  She can hand the player profile to the coach then, but I would also highly recommend sending the complete Introductory Packet by mail or email.  A coach has a lot on his or her mind during competition.

I think it is a good idea what you have planned.  She’ll make an impression on the coach that will make a difference when he or she gets the Intro Packet from your daughter. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballI receive a lot of questions from student-athletes and parents when it comes to recruiting and scholarships.  I remember when I was going through the process with my twin sons, and I had a lot of questions, too.  Here are a couple I’ve received that have risen to the top.  I thought it would be helpful to post them and respond to them, because you may be asking  similar questions.

Q:  I play varsity doubles and have received all-state for 2 years, but it seems very hard to get noticed at the regional/national level in doubles. Any suggestions?

A:  Your struggle is not an uncommon problem for most high school athletes. Even talented ones like yourself get overlooked. Most colleges’ recruiting budgets are limited, and the coaches cannot get out to see that many players. They rely on tournaments, showcases and camps to see large numbers of players at once. Only for exceptional prospects will a coach normally travel to see an individual game or match.

For these reasons, it is extremely important that you take the initiative to let college coaches know about you. Be aggressive in pursuing the schools where you have an interest. Once you make contact with the coaches, you open the door for continued contact. They will write back if they see that you have the tools to play on their team. Your letter, player profile, completed questionnaire, video (if they ask for one), and regular updates are those tools. Continue reading

NCAANational signing day is Wednesday.  It’s a day that gets an incredible amount of hype.  It elevates many but discourages more.

If your kid isn’t an elite athlete, national signing day can leave you cold, worried, anxious.  Of course, tomorrow is just football’s big day, but this kind of hype can send chills down the spines of parents whose athletes compete in other sports.

Why?

Because the air of uncertainty creeps into your mind and emotions.  What if my kid doesn’t land a scholarship?  What if all our effort isn’t rewarded?  What if we can’t afford college unless my son or daughter gets a scholarship?  What if…? Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesFor a high school student-athlete, there aren’t many things more frightening than talking with a college coach on the phone. It can be daunting. And it should be. You’ve been dreaming of getting an athletic scholarship and now the coaches are calling. You’re on the spot.

You need to prepare for these occasions. Once you take a few calls, you’ll get more comfortable. That is, until you get a call from a coach you really want to play for. This school is on your A list. You’ve been hoping he or she will call. And now it happens. It can really make you nervous.

When taking a coach’s call, try to relax. He or she will understand you’re nervous. That’s ok.

Secondly, have a list of questions ready. If the coach is calling your cell phone, you’ll have to think quickly. The list will have to be in your head. Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastJUST RELEASED:  The new episode of The Athletic Scholarship Podcast:  10 Questions Parents Ask — And the Answers. Over the years, I’ve received some great recruiting questions from parents, so I thought I’d start the new year answering 10 of the most common ones.  The answers should help you wherever you are in your scholarship journey.  Listen now.

 

Jon at Ghana market

Open air market I visited on my trip to Ghana.

I was in Ghana, West Africa last week and a high school athlete approached me.  He was a soccer player, of course, or “football” as it is known there.

I was at one of the tourist attractions in the country and he was walking up to all of us to raise money to buy new uniforms for his high school team.  He told me that someday he’d be a star and I would see him on TV.  This boy had a dream.   In a country where the average wage is $3 a day and people are struggling to make a living, he still had a dream.

I think about the high school athletes in this country.  How much are our kids willing to work to achieve their athletic dreams?  How much will they sacrifice to do what it takes to be recruited and get a scholarship?  It takes a lot of work.

Compared to the boy I met in Ghana, kids in the U.S. have it real good.  The basics of life are provided for and the standard of living is way beyond $3 a day.  Our kids compete on travel teams, go to to tournaments regularly, have excellent facilities, go to week-long sports camps and often enjoy nice hotels when they do travel.  I’m not saying every high school athlete has these benefits, but it’s prevalent across the country.

My point is that we need to count our blessings.  Student-athlete, you have a platform to be one who gets recruited and get a scholarship.   Combine that with your athletic ability and you’ve got a shot at it.  You’re miles ahead of a kid in a country that has little opportunity.  But so many of them make the most of their opportunities and pursue their dreams.  Even if it means approaching strangers at a tourist attraction and ask for sponsors for his uniform.

Based on the blessings you have, what will you do today in your pursuit of an athletic scholarship?

I’m praying that this will be a landmark year for parents and high school athletes around the world.  Are you hopeful for your son or daughter’s scholarship chances?

2016

As we start this year, I want to share a few words with parents.  I’ll give you three things you must do and three things not to do in 2016.  Follow these words of advice and you’ll make this year count.

The end result is that you’ll be miles ahead of other families on the road to an athletic scholarship.  These things are based on the results of thousands of families I’ve worked with over the years.

Three things you must do:

ONE: Encourage your athlete.   Teen-agers are emotional (obviously).   They can also be up and down athletically depending on the quality of their latest performance.  And they can get discouraged when this recruiting thing isn’t going the way they had hoped.  As a parent, you need to be their best fan and encourager.

Most of all, you need to bring perspective to the table.  Help your son or daughter see these emotional checkpoints as moments in time.  Walk with them through their pain and help them come out on the other side.   Recognize the pain and discouragement and bring them the words that will keep them going towards their athletic scholarship dream. Continue reading

10 Recruiting questionsHere are 10 of the top questions parents are asking about athletic scholarships.  As we close out 2015 and turn the calendar to the new year, I hope the answers to these questions will keep you pointed in the right direction.

Before we get into them, I want to remind you that my free Recruiting Mini-Course will take you step-by-step through the things you need to do in 2016.  I encourage you to watch this three-part video tutorial.

And now, here are the questions:

ONE:  What’s included in an athletic scholarship?   It depends on the offer, but a scholarship can range from a full ride to a portion of a student-athlete’s college expenses.  Your kid may be offered tuition, or room and board, or books, or a combination of these things.  Each sport has a limit on the number of scholarships it can offer, so the coach has to divide the dollars between the scholarship athletes.

TWO:  How do I get my kid noticed by college coaches?  The most important thing is to take the initiative.  Don’t wait for college coaches to find your son or daughter, because it probably won’t happen.  Sure, the elite athletes get discovered easily.  However, in most cases, kids need to take the first step in order to get the attention of college coaches.  What you should do is put together and send a good, short introductory packet that makes a good first impression on coaches at the schools you have interest in.  You’ll be surprised how this simple step can produce amazing results.

THREE:  Are athletic scholarships guaranteed for four years?  No.  Scholarships are usually awarded year-to-year, although the NCAA allows multi-year offers.  If a student-athlete performs poorly, he can lose his scholarship the next year.  Behavior and grades are other factors that can affect an athlete’s scholarship renewal.  It is important to read the language of the scholarship agreement and ask questions.

[Special Note:  I wanted to alert you to the $60 Off Sale on any Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Check it out.  Sale ends January 5.]

FOUR:  How common is a full-ride scholarship?  Full ride scholarships are only offered in “head count sports.”  The remainder of the sports are called “equivalency sports,” where coaches divide the scholarships among the scholarship athletes.   These athletes receive “partial scholarships.”  Full-ride sports at the D1 level are  football, men and women’s basketball, and women’s gymnastics, volleyball and tennis.

Continue reading

2015The sun is setting on 2015.  The calendar will soon turn to 2016 and gasps will go out among student-athletes and parents. It’s January already! It’s 2016! How did that happen?

I want you to be successful and I’m going to lay out something that will make success a reality.

The reality of the ticking clock will hit a lot of families on January 1. I don’t want you to be caught getting behind in your scholarship pursuit. I don’t want you to miss opportunities.

I remember the turning point for our family was the week between Christmas and New Years. That’s when we met Jeff. We sat down across the table from him in a Southern California restaurant. You see, Jeff was our mentor. Without Jeff, we wouldn’t have made it. He led our family through the whole process, which resulted in a fully paid education at my boys’ school of choice. Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastI’m just a couple days away from releasing the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.  This time, you’ll get the benefit of hearing from a college coach who has been recruiting at some of the nation’s leading programs for two decades.

Here are three things he pushed during the interview.  I’ll only give you a cursory view here,  because I want you to hear the details in his own words.   Be sure to check back on my podcast page in a couple days for the release of this new episode.

  1.  Do your research.  This coach made a  big point about visiting the schools highest on your list and spending time on campus, with the coach, and watching the team work out.  This would be an unofficial visit, and you can make as many of those as you want.
  2. Academics is so important.  If you don’t have the grades, the coach can’t get you in. So work hard now so you can have a choice of schools when it’s time to make your decision.
  3. The scholarship offer is not the most important factor in your decision.  So what is most important?  This coach will talk in more detail about this in the interview.

Continue reading

Congratulations to Karina Diaz, the winner of a $75 Sports Authority Gift Card.  She entered the contest during the Grand Opening of Athletic Scholarship University.  Karina, this is a good way to start the Christmas season!

Women's basketballIf you’re a talented athlete, you’re blessed.  You have to realize that not everyone is talented.  Your talent is something that you may take for granted, but this Thanksgiving I encourage you to give thanks to the good Lord who gave it to you.

In fact, take an athletic inventory.  What sets you apart from your competitors?  Think details.  Height, weight, speed, certain skills.

Then take an inventory of your accomplishments.  Think back over the past year or two and list what you’ve done.

Say a big “Thank You” for all these things.  You are a unique individual with a set of talents and accomplishments that no one else possesses.  Never take that for granted.  Then… Continue reading

VolleyballRecruiting is a hard world, and if you don’t have your act together, it can beat you up.  Here are the first three of a dozen recruiting rules that I’ve laid out for families.  I hope these three help.  You can get the full dozen (and three bonus rules!) by downloading the Guide I’ve put together.

Download “12 Rules of Recruiting and Athletic Scholarships”

Recruiting Rule #1:  Know When to Start. 

The number one question I get from parents is, “When should we start the recruiting process?”

I remember getting an email from one parent whose son was a senior, asking if it was too late. A moment later, I received an email from a freshman parent asking if it was too early! So, as you can see, there is some confusion out there.

You should start early. In fact, as early as the freshman year, if that’s possible. But, even if you are in the senior year, it’s still probably not too late. You just have to work faster. Continue reading

Tomorrow night is my premier webinar and you’re invited:

5 Step to an Athletic Scholarship:  How to Get Recruited in 30 Days.

I’ll be walking you through the five steps that will give you the focus and direction your family needs in this exciting and challenging journey.  I don’t know where you’re at in the process, but I do know that you’ll come away from this webinar with solid steps of action.  When we did the recruiting thing with our sons, it was a huge blessing to have someone guide us and give us specific steps of action.  You’ll get that tomorrow night.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

9 PM Eastern/ 8 PM Central/ 7 PM Mountain/ 6 PM Pacific

My Video Invite to You

If you follow just the first two steps, your student-athlete will start hearing from coaches in 30 days or less.

How to Watch

This high-energy live video event will be presented on the LIVE WEBINAR PAGE , as well as on YouTube and Google Hangouts. Choose your way.

Watch on your computer or any mobile device. If you’re using your mobile device, you may want to watch on YouTube.

RSVP

Please RSVP by emailing me or on the Event Page and I’ll see you Thursday night, November 5. Invite other parents and athletes to attend.

Everyone attending will receive a Recruiting Checklist as a follow-up to what I teach you on the webinar.

To watch on Google Hangouts, follow this link:

https://plus.google.com/events/cgr7tavvgukf6qimdj54157avu4

#1It’s great book.  It’s a #1 best seller.  It’s called The One Thing and it has transformed the way I approach my projects in life and work.

And it can help you in big ways in your scholarship pursuit.

Gary Keller, founder of the biggest real estate company in America, is the author.  So, considering his success, I thought it was worth reading.  What I learned from him is something I want to pass along to you.

I’ll be digging more deeply into this in Thursday’s podcast and in the upcoming Webinar next week, but I want to lay the groundwork for you here so you can get your head around what he advises.  And you can start applying it right away.

It will change the results you’re getting in recruiting.  It will put you head and shoulders above other families.  It will get you to your goal.  Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsRecruiting can be a mess.

How’s that for an opening line?  Well, it’s true and sometimes I just need to say it.  It’s so confusing that parents and athletes are left at the starting line while the clock keeps ticking on a kid’s high school career.

How about you?  Are you confused or discouraged?  Have you been spinning your wheels or fallen into a ditch?  Or has your experience been pretty good, even excellent?  Share your experience in the comment section below.  Other parents can benefit from what you have to say.  And I’d like to know what you’re dealing with.

This quote is from a Forbes article earlier this month:

“A lot of kids think they’re being recruited, when they really aren’t,” said Kimberly Oden, a former Stanford volleyball player who now advises high-school students and their families on college-sports possibilities. Coaches may send out 150 form letters to possible prospects, Oden noted. Most of those early feelers go nowhere.

News like this is tragic. Parents and athletes are under false impressions, and as I said, the clock keeps ticking.  Yet, nothing happens.

This isn’t news to me.  I’ve seen it for years.  But I am at the point where I just have to do more about this.  I am stepping up my game so families can step up theirs.

Here’s what I mean. Continue reading

High school footballHow can you be sure you’re doing the right things in your athletic scholarship pursuit?  You may be getting input from friends, coaches, blogs, books, paid services and consultants, not to mention everything you read all over the Internet.

What’s true and what’s not?  It’s a big issue, and I address this and four other points in the premier episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.

You’ll come away with action steps in the areas of who, what, how, where and when.

The featured question in this episode comes from Bill, “One of the toughest things that we face as coaches and parents, is that we are in a small rural farm community with not a lot around us. Our record is not the greatest, and when you add all of this together, college coaches do not come visit or recruit at our school. How do we get these coaches to reach out to us and our kids?”  Jon answers this question.

BaseballI also shares my personal story and the story of my twin sons who succeeded in getting a fully paid education and competing at the school of their choice.  I’ll explain how they got there and the lessons our family learned.  Lessons you can take to heart, too.

Listen to the podcast.

BallsI’ve been looking around and no one has done it, so I decided I would.  I’m launching the Athletic Scholarship Podcast in a couple days. In the first episode, I’m starting with a couple stories.  My story and your story.  I want you to hear my experiences over the years and how they might translate into yours.

I want to help you with your story from this day forward.  That’s what the Athletic Scholarship Podcast is all about.

In the first episode, I dig into five things that will help you avoid pain, disappointment and financial disaster.  I thought I’d preview the first one here with you in writing.

#1: WHO.

Be careful who you listen to.  There’s so much bad advice out there and it can cost you.  Not only financially, but your son or daughter’s future.  Their college future is too important to mess with, and you need to be careful.

You can get a lot of information online, but how good is it?  Just because the website looks good doesn’t mean you should believe the content.  I say that even for the things you read on my site.  Verify, verify, verify.  Check the information against what you see, read, and hear elsewhere.  If there’s consistency, then it’s likely that the advice is valid. Continue reading

Jon FuglerSo many families have asked some great questions about recruiting and athletic scholarships, and I’ve been listening. As a result, I’m thrilled to announce a brand new resource that will answer those questions and go beyond what you’ve expressed or imagined.

This is something that I’ve had on my plate for over a year, and it will make its debut in the next two weeks. I’ll be addressing the biggest issues in recruiting and scholarships when I debut the “Athletic Scholarship Podcast.” It’s the only podcast of its kind.

Podcasting is becoming one of the fastest growing digital tools for learning and gathering information on your terms. It’s on demand so it’s on your schedule. This regular audio vault will get right to the heart of what you need to know and do as your family pursues an athletic scholarship. Continue reading

Basketball in hoopGetting an athletic scholarship isn’t all about the money.  Parents and student-athletes can let their pride get in the way of the best choice.  They put the scholarship offer at the top of the list and the kid ends up at a college and program that aren’t the best fit.

In my case, I transferred after just one year.  I really enjoyed my first choice, the University of Minnesota.  But it wasn’t the best fit athletically or academically.

I have to admit that I transferred to Indiana University for athletic reasons, but other factors fell into place to make IU the best fit overall.  I’m glad for my Minnesota experience, but I’m thrilled for my Indiana experience.

I could have saved myself and my parents a lot of stress and expense had I known then what I know today. Continue reading

After the race with my good friend Wayne.

After the race with my good friend Wayne. I’m the one drenched in sweat on the left.

I ran a marathon on Saturday.  OK, it was only 5K, but for me it felt like a marathon.  The humidity was just short of stifling, the temperatures were in the 70s, and it was only 7 am.  On top of that, I was up until 1 am preparing for the launch of Athletic Scholarship University.

And on top of that … yes another “on top of that” statement, the course was a quarter-mile more than 5K!  I know because I had my running app on during the race.  Yeah, somebody had a sense of humor.

Despite all these things, I ran my best race in years!  Maybe it was because this was sea level and I live at 6,800 feet elevation.  I was mighty proud of my 8:55 miles, over 30 seconds ahead of my normal pace.  I was a gazelle.

Now let me draw a comparison to recruiting.  You’re running a marathon, not a 5K.  It can last years, and you need to be ready.  Here’s how you can train for your recruiting marathon.  And that’s how you need to look at it.

#1.  Mental preparation is key.  When I prepared for my 5K, I knew it was going to be warm and humid.  I knew the course was over 5K (I ran it last year).  So I was ready.  In the same way, you need to be mentally ready to run your recruiting course.  If you can anticipate as much as possible, then you’re ahead before you start.  Yes, there will be surprises, but prepare for things you know about in advance.

In recruiting, mentally prepare by going your homework on schools, programs and coaches.  Know in advance which schools are priorities for you.  Go online, make phone calls, place visits.  This is all part of the preparation you should do in order for the recruiting process to run as smooth as it can.  But do be ready for surprises. Continue reading

FlyingI’m in the air right now flying to a conference in Florida. I took an aisle seat, so I have to strain to see the view below. To make it even more difficult, I’m over the wing. In other words, this isn’t a seat with view.

I got to thinking about the importance of taking a view of recruiting from 30,000 feet. Are you feeling pressured, tired, distracted, even confused in your athletic scholarship hunt? It can happen when you’re in the battle. I remember those days.

You can’t see the end. It’s a struggle, things aren’t going perfectly and you never seem to be as far along as you’d like. If that’s you, then take a flight. Not a hike. A flight.

In this post, I’ll show you what I mean and how you can do three things that will absolutely get you back on the right path to that scholarship pursuit.  Here’s how…

Continue reading

IcebergGetting recruited isn’t magic.  Coaches don’t just show up at your doorstep, or at your games, meets or matches.

However, most parents don’t realize this.  They don’t see what goes on behind the scenes to get the attention of college coaches.  That has to be frustrating.

Picture an iceberg.  What you see above the surface is minute compared to what’s below the surface.  That’s why a mighty cruise ship can be destroyed by running into an iceberg.  But you knew that.

In recruiting, there’s a lot that goes on below the surface to attract the attention of college coaches.  Let me run a few by you.

1.  Moving towards coaches.  Don’t wait for them to find your son or daughter.  Take an aggressive stand and get your athlete’s name out there.  Letters, emails, phone calls, camp appearances are all ways that y0u can get the coaches to take notice.  Continue reading

[NOTE:  Five Steps to an Athletic Scholarship, a Free Mini-Course from Recruit-Me, will be available in just a few days.  This is the only step-by-step course available today and will expand on some of the things in this blog post, as well as much more.  Check back in a few days and you’ll see how to get started with the first lesson.]

Signing Most people don’t understand the process that gets an athlete recruited.  The official signing is what most of us see or hear about, but we have no idea what went into getting the student-athlete in that position.

Is it a big mystery?  To most families, it is.  So let me lay out five factors that cause an athlete to get recruited:

1.  Talent.  There’s no substitute for this.  But don’t be fooled.  Your son or daughter doesn’t need to be the best in the league or on the team.  They key is that he or she has the talent to compete at the next level.  If that’s the case, there’s a good chance a scholarship is in their future.  It’s important to cast your net wide, because you don’t know which programs are looking for recruits at your son or daughter’s talent level.  Don’t get hung up on particular schools at the outset.  It will take time to see which ones are the best fit. Continue reading

TrackI won’t kid you.  The recruiting journey is not easy.   Let’s face it, your son or daughter is probably not in the top 100 in the nation in their sport.  Coaches are not going to flock to them.  The will have to work.

Such was the case with our twin boys.  They were not the best in the league, county or on their team.  They had to put out effort to be seen by college coaches.  Effort off the field in order to be seen on the field.

I remember spending a lot of time with them, helping them write letters, send information to coaches, put together a video, go to camps, travel for tournaments…  all those things.  And you know what?  It was worth it.  Even if they had not gotten a scholarship.  Yeah, we grew close through this experience. Continue reading

VolleyballYesterday, I was talking with a woman who recently completed her volleyball career at one of the top D2 schools in the nation.  She gave me some good insights that I wanted to pass along to you.  Her husband, also a star athlete, added to her advice.  The conversation lasted only a few minutes, but here’s what I learned:

1.  If you can’t compete at the D1 level, don’t.  She told me she was too short to play D1, so she didn’t try to get onto a team at that level.  Instead, she went with a program that was a good fit, and was a scholarship athlete on a championship team.  She had a great experience.  I’m sure she actually could have played D1 somewhere, but probably not in a quality program where she ended up.  Continue reading

2015 track“My biggest challenge is getting coaches’ attention.”  That’s a statement I heard over and over again from you when I put out the survey asking you about your biggest challenge.  Other ways you stated it…

“Getting coaches to look at me.”

“Getting coaches to notice me and be interested.”

If you’re a parent, this is the biggest challenge your son or daughter is likely facing.  In fact, I’d call it the biggest fear.

My heart goes out to you, because I know it’s a helpless feeling and I want you to be empowered.  There’s a saying that “knowledge is power,” and that’s why I’m committed to providing parents and their athletes the best knowledge to overcome the biggest challenges and succeed at getting a scholarship.

You will experience power that wipes out fear and uncertainty when you have the right knowledge.  In this post, let’s take a look at three solutions to this one big challenge. 

Continue reading

It’s one thing to get the interest of college coaches, but how do you keep the interest up and how do you deepen the relationship?  As a parent, you can’t do this for your kids,  but you can certainly help them.

When we were going through this process with our sons, we took an active role in the relationships between coaches and our kids.  In fact, the coaches enjoyed talking with us, too, because they wanted to see what kind of family our boys came from.  While we were careful not to dominate the conversations, we did get involved.

The bottom line is that the coach wants to develop the relationship with the student-athlete, so it’s vital that your son our daughter is prepared for the conversations.

In this post, I want to take you to a clip from a video I recorded recently for student-athletes, and it addresses what to do when coaches contact the student-athlete.  I call it “closing the loop” in the recruiting process.

Parents, it’s important that you know this information, because you’ll be coaching your son or daughter in this process.  You can help him or her interact with coaches and move them further up on the coaches’ list.  So, let’s go for it…

 

Please let me know what you think of the video.  I’m recording a new video series right now, which will be part of  free mini-course on recruiting that I’ll make available in a few weeks.  Your comments and questions will help me as I finalize the content.

There are some important websites that will help you in your scholarship pursuit. I’d like to recommend five of them for you to bookmark and check on a regular basis.

NCAA1. NCAA. Of course, this is the daddy of them all, and it’s well worth checking regularly. They have news that often pertains to recruiting, and a number of resource pages within the site.  One of these pages is the recruiting calendar.

2. NAIA.  The NAIA is an association of schools throughout the country which have similar recruiting rules, but some key differences.  One difference is that a recruit can actually work out with the team Continue reading

A pounding hail storm that turned in to a steady rain halted any chance of me recording a video post today, so we’ll have to cover the material the old-fashioned way.  Well, I did shoot an 18-second video with my phone, but it has nothing to do with recruiting.  Check out the hail:

 

This week, I have a tough question for you to answer.

You are probably in one of three situations.

1.  You’ve been pursuing an athletic scholarship for your son our daughter for some time.  Maybe a year or more.  And you’re not sure how it will all turn out.

2.  You’ve been working on this for a very short time.  You’ve done some things, but coaches aren’t knocking the door down.

3.  You’re just getting started in the scholarship pursuit. Continue reading

How would you like to get into the mind of a college coach to understand what he or she is looking for in a recruit?  W0uldn’t that help you with your son’s or daughter’s pursuit of an athletic scholarship?

In this week’s blog post, I get face-to-face with you to share five of the most important things a coach is looking for.  I hope this helps to center yourselves as you go through the recruiting process.

NOTE:  Summer is just about here, and you need to be thinking about summer plans as they relate to recruiting.  You might want to take a few informal school visits.  Also, be looking for tournaments, showcases and camps you might want your son or daughter to compete at.

TrackI’m going to scare a lot of parents with this blog post. I’m going against the grain of a well-funded industry. And I’m going to reveal some things to you that you won’t want to hear.

I’ve heard from many parents over the years about how they were disillusioned by recruiting services and online registries. The latter are sites where you can upload a profile and video of your son or daughter.

And many college coaches are disappointed, too. An article in the Times Herald-Record in Middletown, CT revealed some pretty candid statements by area college coaches. Check this out: Continue reading

Back patio viewAs I sit here blogging on the back patio, with a view in the distance of where my boys played college ball, it is a bit surreal. You see, our family lived 1,100 miles away when our sons came here. My wife and I made the treks every spring to watch them play, but never in a blue moon expected to live here someday.

All three of our kids are still at least 1,100 miles away from us, spread around the world. In fact, one son and his family are 5,000 miles away by my estimate. But, here I am, watching the sun set over the campus, nestled in the foothills in the picture.

I guess you could say I’m “dreaming backwards.” Instead of thinking ahead about college careers and possible scholarships, I’m reflecting on those days they did compete here. And, thankfully, we didn’t have to pay anything.

But, for you, the dream is ahead of you for your son or daughter. I’ve had such a good time lately talking with and having email exchanges with several parents. I’m energized about the opportunity to help their student-athlete get an athletic scholarship.

I’m committed to that.  “But how long does this crazy experience take?” you might be asking “And when should we start?”   But more importantly, I want to share with you how to get extraordinary results.

Continue reading

After Tuesday night’s teleseminar, honestly, I was exhausted.  But it was such a good event, and I’ve gotten excellent feedback on it.  The free audio download is available through tomorrow night, March 31, so I encourage you to download and listen at your convenience.

Get “Five Steps to an Athletic Scholarship” Download

How can you do the recruiting process right if you don’t know the foundational truth?  In the video at the top of this post, I reveal that truth and give you a real-life example in one family’s successful recruiting experience.

In the video, I mention that I offered a free Recruiting Checklist to everyone on the call the other night.  This Checklist will help you go deeper into the recruiting experience and is a follow-up to the five steps you’ll hear on the teleseminar.  Listen to the download and you’ll find out how to receive the Checklist.

The free checklist and offers explained on the teleseminar expire tomorrow night (Tuesday) at midnight.  I hope you’ll capture the urgency to get your recruiting program into high gear this spring.

I was just reading the other day about a local high school girl who made her verbal commitment to a major school for basketball.  I’m sure thousands of high school athletes read the same story and wondered how they could be the next success story.  Parents were asking the same question about their son or daughter.

Jon Fugler

Jon Fugler

In today’s post, I want to discuss three common roadblocks to an athletic scholarship and how to overcome them.  Then maybe your son or daughter will be a future success story documented in the paper.

Roadblock #1:  Lack of focus.   It’s amazing how much money parents will spend to try to get their kids an athletic scholarship.  It may start with less than a hundred dollars for a camp, but somewhere along the way it has escalated to thousands of dollars for multiple camps, tournament exposure, showcases, travel, consultants and services.

You can’t have a shotgun approach, thinking that the more you do the greater the chance for a scholarship.  It comes down to be strategically focused.  You’ll save your family time and money by mapping out your strategy and sticking with it.  Stay focused.  Beware of the voices of other parents and so-called experts who distract you and pull you in different directions.

Roadblock #2:  Laziness.  There, I said it.  In this day and age, people expect things to come easy.  Even as athletes and parents of athletes, we can get caught up in this trap.  As a result, we get lazy about giving our best.  That translates into our efforts to get our kids an athletic scholarship.

But, it’s not just the parent’s deal.  The student-athlete needs to put out.  If the parent is working like crazy at this, but the athlete is not, the team falls apart.  Yes, team.  The parent and the athlete are a team in this and both must avoid laziness at all costs.  This venture is too important for laziness, so have the “hard work” discussion early and often.

Parents, be the coach in the recruiting process.  Do what you can to motivate your son our daughter.  Be positive.  Teach life lessons.  Reward them when they’re giving it their best (I don’t mean on the field).  Make this a positive experience, even to the point where you are the buffer for disappointment.  If you’re discouraged or hit a rough road in this, don’t pass that along to your child.  Have a coach mindset.

Roadblock #3:  Quitting before the breakthrough.  The recruiting process is a marathon, and there will be a point when you hit the wall.  It may be earlier for your son or daughter than it is for you.  It happened to me and it happens to most.

A series of “We’re not interested” letters or calls from coaches can cause you to hit the wall.  A period of silence can do that, too.  Exhaustion from this whole doggone process can convince you to quit.  There are a number of reason you can feel like giving up along the way.

The tragedy will be to quit before the breakthrough.  For our family, our breakthrough was when a coach discovered our sons and pursued them — after a handful of coaches had stopped communicating and had lost interest.  Was it discouraging when there was silence?  Yes, but the breakthrough came shortly afterwards.

Don’t quit too soon.  Your breakthrough could be around the corner.  Even at the last minute.  Continue pursuing possibilities and opportunities.  The coach on the other end of the equation is looking for a breakthrough, too.

Give me your thoughts on roadblocks. Are you facing one now?  Have you come through one and you’ve experienced a breakthrough?  Comment below and let me and others know.

 

Can your son or daughter really get an athletic scholarship in five easy steps?

No, but I assure you that they can get one in five simple steps.  I’ve been teaching families these five steps since 2002, and they work.

 Join me for a free teleseminar for parents:

“FIVE STEPS TO AN ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP”
A Recruiting Seminar for Parents

Tuesday, March 24,  8:00-8:45 PM Eastern Time

I checked and there are no March Madness games that night!

Come with questions, because after I go through the five steps, I’ll open the phone lines for some dialogue.

How to Join the Call

Dial (712) 775-7031
Enter the Conference Code 415-095-289

BONUS:  Because I want you to apply the five steps right away, everyone on the call will receive my Recruiting Checklist.  I’ll let you know how to access it.

To RSVP, email me at jon@recruit-me.com and I’ll reserve your spot.  I encourage you to print out this page as a reminder of the date, time and call-in number.  I’d hate for you to miss the event.

Why Show Up?

You’re going to learn what to do right now in order to get your son or daughter recruited.  I’ll be cutting through the clutter that has left parents shaking their heads, wondering what to do and what not to do.  There’s so much information out there, but no one puts it together into a step-by-step process and plan.  I will do that for you on the 24th.

 

If you’re like most parents, you have more information that you can handle when it comes to recruiting.  Well, I’m here to tell you it doesn’t have to be that way.  You can indeed filter out the stuff you don’t need.

In this post, I want to get down to the core of what one thing you have to do to get your son or daughter an athletic scholarship.

“One thing?” you ask.  You can’t be serious.  Yes, one thing.  I’m passionate about it, as you’ll see in this video post.

What will you do today based on what you heard in the video?  Don’t leave this page until you’ve made that decision.  In fact, write it in the comment section below.

Track star

Recruiting services and consultants can provide benefit for the student-athlete and parents.  I know the truth of that.  Our family benefited greatly from a recruiting coach who walked us all the way through the process.

However, it’s dangerous to give away control of your recruiting campaign.   If you do, you may be in for some unpleasant surprises.  Thankfully, our recruiting coach kept us right in the center of everything.

You can’t just step away and give the process over to someone else. You need to own it.  You need to be involved in the decisions about your son or daughter’s future.  And especially during their scholarship pursuit.  It’s too important to release, even to an expert. Continue reading

College campusWith twin sons on their way to college over a decade ago, my wife and I were facing the prospect of huge college debt.  Our daughter was already in college and we were stretched to the max.

If it weren’t for the scholarships our boys received, I think we’d still be paying off college debt.

You may be in a similar situation, so you know how important it is for you to pursue an athletic scholarship for your son or daughter.  In fact, your student-athlete doesn’t realize how important this is.  Continue reading

TrackIt’s that time of year again.  In January, you can almost hear the engines starting as parents and student-athletes decide to go for it.  They have a fresh perspective and new energy as the year starts in pursuing an athletic scholarship.

However, fresh energy and the will to go for a scholarship for your son or daughter doesn’t cut it alone.  You’ve got to have knowledge and the tools to succeed.  Just like an athlete, attitude is critical, but without talent he or she will not go very far.

When it comes to leading your family to an athletic scholarship, I encourage you, as a parent, to do three things this month. Continue reading

SurveyI just received this comment and question from a student-athlete.  His question is not uncommon, and his thoughts about his situation are not uncommon either.  I thought that his question was so important that I’d answer it here for you, too.

Q:  I’m going to be a Sophomore next year and I might go for Varsity football. I play quarterback and I’m almost 6’0.  I have good grades.  What do I have to do to get a scholarship to a D1 school? Where I live is a small town and our Division is D4, so it harder to get scouts to look at you and to get scholarships. I would do anything to get to a d1 school.  I always work hard and try to be the best that I could. What should i do?? Continue reading

BaseballIt was Christmas over a dozen years ago that we launched our recruiting efforts for our twin sons.  You might think that’s a strange time to get started.  Well, there’s NO bad time to get started.  It actually worked well for us, because our boys were on vacation and we had blocks of time to work on the front-end work we had to do.  It was also mentally great to start the new year with our recruiting campaign in gear.

How about you?  Are you planning to maximize Christmas break? Continue reading

College CoachesThere are 3 things that you and your son or daughter can do to keep the coaches’ interest over the long haul. The first and most important one is that you keep communicating with the coaches. That may sound obvious but you would be surprised at how often families just sit back and don’t do anything after the first contact. We talk to coaches and they tell us if you stop communicating, they will assume you have lost interest and your son or daughter moves off their list.

So above all, you have to keep communicating.  I don’t mean calling or writing the coaches with no purpose, but by having some substance when you do contact them. There are some key documents that you can send coaches on a regular basis that they welcome and it works great to keep their interest. Continue reading