athletic scholarship

Athletic Scholarship PodcastThe weekly Recruit-Me Blog is now the weekly Recruit-Me Podcast…

The Athletic Scholarship Podcast: 15 Minutes That Will Change Your Scholarship Future.

I’ve been blogging for a few years.  Now I’ve decided to zero in on the stream of communication that is my most effective and where I can teach you the best stuff.

If you’ve got 15 minutes on the road, on the run (literally) or sitting in traffic, I’ve got fresh content for you every Tuesday.

Head on over there now for the latest episode.

Baseball

When we were parents on the scholarship trail for our twin sons, we didn’t have the resources that are available today.

For instance, college websites weren’t as complete as they are now.  I don’t think Facebook existed.  We really had to dig.  We needed personal conversations with coaches and administrative staff to really get a picture of that school.  Today, you’ve got just about everything at your fingertips. Continue reading

QuestionWhen it comes to evaluating their son or daughter, parents usually make one of two mistakes:

  1.  They overrate them, or
  2.  They underrate them

Let’s be honest about it.  There’s usually no way we can be objective in evaluating our kid’s athletic ability. 

If that’s the case, how can we know whether they can get a scholarship?  Or, if they can, at what level?  What’s realistic?

I know I faced each of those questions with my twin sons.  I so much wanted them to make it in college as athletes.  I believed they could get scholarships.  I’m not sure how strongly they believed it.  I led the charge and they followed … and got that fully paid education while competing in the sport they loved.

Now it’s your turn to make that call.  How far can your athlete go?  Is he or she athletic scholarship material?  Continue reading

TrackI had a great conversation one night with a man who has dedicated his life to helping student-athletes land at the right school… with the right scholarship.  We agreed on a number of points:

1.  Unless you’re a Blue Chip athlete, you will likely not be “found” by college coaches.  You need to take your scholarship efforts into your own hands as a family and get out there to be seen by college coaches.  Not only that, but you must do the right things.  A shotgun approach to this will not work.  You’ll be disappointed.  You need to have a game plan, just like you do when you’re competing as an athlete. Continue reading

Journey(Summer Recruiting Breakthrough Sale has begun.  Get $80-$100 off a Recruit-Me Premium purchase).

On this first day of summer, reality hits.

The major recruiting season is underway.  The next 60 days can be the road to an athletic scholarship.  The challenge is to stay on the road and not slide off the shoulder.

Let me share three things that you’ll need to do this summer to stay on the scholarship road.  Don’t get sidetracked and end up in the ditch.

You see, if you can keep your son or daughter disciplined this summer, it will yield huge benefits.  Athletic, academic and financial.

#1: Get out of the garage. The summer will pass you by if you don’t get started.  There’s a tendency to take it easy in the summer but recruiting doesn’t go on vacation in June, July and August.  If you stay in “park,” you’ll be left in the dust by other families that realize that summer is golden for recruiting. Continue reading

Track communicationIt’s been a good Recruiting Breakthrough Week. I’ve alerted you to a critical recruiting season that will happen over the next 60-90 days. Summer is huge, especially since all college sports will be out of season and the coaches are recruiting heavily.

I urge you–make this truly a Recruiting Breakthrough Week for your family. It leads to a Breakthrough Summer. Please don’t miss the golden opportunity.

Here’s your “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5.” It’s your last one and will indeed give you a recruiting edge this summer.

Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5: Track your communications with coaches with excellence. It pays off. Continue reading

High school footballLet’s think about something together.

If you could get your son or daughter on multiple college coaches’ radars this summer, how would you feel?

Relieved … joyful … empowered … hopeful … confident?

If you could do one thing, what would you do to guarantee your son or daughter gets recruited this summer?

 

  • Produce a video and post it on BeRecruited or on another recruiting site?Women's basketball
  • Get your athlete to the top three camps?
  • Complete the online recruiting forms at 15 schools you have identified as your top choice programs?
  • Have your son or daughter call five coaches a week to personally express interest in their programs?

Remember, I’m asking you to narrow it down to one thing that would guarantee your student-athlete gets recruited this summer.

That’s a tough choice, isn’t it?  But it really does make you think.

Everything I’ve listed is valid, but not one of these is the right thing to do if you want to guarantee your son or daughter gets recruited… this summer!

Recruiting Checklist

Continue reading

BaseballI was thinking about some of the big questions parents and athletes ask me about what it takes to get an athletic scholarship. Most people know so little about it.

I was there once, when I was working on getting my sons recruited.  But over the years, I’ve become an expert who has helped thousands of other families.

I can’t give all the answers in one post, but I can give you one:  hard work.

For example, I was reading about Lindsay Brown, who accepted a scholarship offer for volleyball. She had interestVolleyball from several schools, including New Hampshire, Oregon State, Louisiana Tech, Lewis & Clark College, Dominican University, Menlo College, UC Santa Barbara and UC Riverside. She chose Sonoma State, which is near her home town. Continue reading

College basketballYou could call this a showcase blog post.  It’s the kind of post that hits the prime things any family needs to know about recruiting.  If you’re just getting started in the journey, this is the post you need to read. 

If you’ve been at it for a while, this is the kind of post you need to re-read.  It’s getting back to basics when your efforts get scattered.  In fact, I was re-focused when I wrote this.  It reminded me about staying true north.

As always, feel free to write me with thoughts or questions.

 

Need to Know #1: When to Start

The number one question I get from parents is, “When should we start the recruiting process?”Athletic scholarship questions

I remember getting an email from one parent whose son was a senior, asking if it was too late. A moment later, I received an email from a freshman parent asking if it was too early!

Just this week, a parent wrote me, “We have twin daughters.  They are only freshmen in high school.  Is it too early to start the process?”

So, as you can see, there is some confusion out there.

You should start early. In fact, as early as the freshman year, if that’s possible.

But, even if you start in the senior year, it’s still probably not too late. You just have to work faster.  Of course, this late in the year you really need to hustle.  You need to apply the five steps I teach and do it fast.  Now back to the subject at hand… Continue reading

workoutDo you get “Aha!” moments when you’re working out?  I mean, when your head is clear and good ideas sometimes flow in?  Say “yes.”  It will make me feel better.

Here’s the “Aha!” moment I had recently while I was working out, and it involves you.

I’m going to reveal to you the secret to getting recruited by college coaches.

I’ve been presenting “the five steps to an athletic scholarship” for years, but often it falls on deaf ears.  It has had me perplexed, because what I share are the step-by-step actions a family needs to take to get an athletic scholarship.  Seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it?

What’s even more frustrating is that it works for families who apply the five sequential steps!  Frustrating because I know most families are missing out because they don’t apply the steps.

“Why don’t more families do it?”

I’m glad you asked.  Here’s why… Continue reading

Athletic Scholarship PodcastJUST RELEASED:  The new episode of The Athletic Scholarship Podcast:  10 Questions Parents Ask — And the Answers. Over the years, I’ve received some great recruiting questions from parents, so I thought I’d start the new year answering 10 of the most common ones.  The answers should help you wherever you are in your scholarship journey.  Listen now.

 

Jon at Ghana market

Open air market I visited on my trip to Ghana.

I was in Ghana, West Africa last week and a high school athlete approached me.  He was a soccer player, of course, or “football” as it is known there.

I was at one of the tourist attractions in the country and he was walking up to all of us to raise money to buy new uniforms for his high school team.  He told me that someday he’d be a star and I would see him on TV.  This boy had a dream.   In a country where the average wage is $3 a day and people are struggling to make a living, he still had a dream.

I think about the high school athletes in this country.  How much are our kids willing to work to achieve their athletic dreams?  How much will they sacrifice to do what it takes to be recruited and get a scholarship?  It takes a lot of work.

Compared to the boy I met in Ghana, kids in the U.S. have it real good.  The basics of life are provided for and the standard of living is way beyond $3 a day.  Our kids compete on travel teams, go to to tournaments regularly, have excellent facilities, go to week-long sports camps and often enjoy nice hotels when they do travel.  I’m not saying every high school athlete has these benefits, but it’s prevalent across the country.

My point is that we need to count our blessings.  Student-athlete, you have a platform to be one who gets recruited and get a scholarship.   Combine that with your athletic ability and you’ve got a shot at it.  You’re miles ahead of a kid in a country that has little opportunity.  But so many of them make the most of their opportunities and pursue their dreams.  Even if it means approaching strangers at a tourist attraction and ask for sponsors for his uniform.

Based on the blessings you have, what will you do today in your pursuit of an athletic scholarship?

I’m praying that this will be a landmark year for parents and high school athletes around the world.  Are you hopeful for your son or daughter’s scholarship chances?

2016

As we start this year, I want to share a few words with parents.  I’ll give you three things you must do and three things not to do in 2016.  Follow these words of advice and you’ll make this year count.

The end result is that you’ll be miles ahead of other families on the road to an athletic scholarship.  These things are based on the results of thousands of families I’ve worked with over the years.

Three things you must do:

ONE: Encourage your athlete.   Teen-agers are emotional (obviously).   They can also be up and down athletically depending on the quality of their latest performance.  And they can get discouraged when this recruiting thing isn’t going the way they had hoped.  As a parent, you need to be their best fan and encourager.

Most of all, you need to bring perspective to the table.  Help your son or daughter see these emotional checkpoints as moments in time.  Walk with them through their pain and help them come out on the other side.   Recognize the pain and discouragement and bring them the words that will keep them going towards their athletic scholarship dream. Continue reading

ChristmasFirst of all, Merry Christmas!  I hope your family will experience the joy of Jesus’ birth, God’s gift to a needy world.

I want to discuss three common roadblocks to an athletic scholarship and how to overcome them.  Then maybe your son or daughter will be a future success story.

Roadblock #1:  Lack of focus.   It’s amazing how much money parents will spend to try to get their kids an athletic scholarship.  It may start with less than a hundred dollars for a camp, but somewhere along the way it has escalated to thousands of dollars for multiple camps, tournament exposure, showcases, travel, consultants and services.

You can’t have a shotgun approach, thinking that the more you do the greater the chance for a scholarship.  It comes down to be strategically focused.  You’ll save your family time and money by mapping out your strategy and sticking with it.  Stay focused.  Beware of the voices of other parents and so-called experts who distract you and pull you in different directions. Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsRecruiting can be a mess.

How’s that for an opening line?  Well, it’s true and sometimes I just need to say it.  It’s so confusing that parents and athletes are left at the starting line while the clock keeps ticking on a kid’s high school career.

How about you?  Are you confused or discouraged?  Have you been spinning your wheels or fallen into a ditch?  Or has your experience been pretty good, even excellent?  Share your experience in the comment section below.  Other parents can benefit from what you have to say.  And I’d like to know what you’re dealing with.

This quote is from a Forbes article earlier this month:

“A lot of kids think they’re being recruited, when they really aren’t,” said Kimberly Oden, a former Stanford volleyball player who now advises high-school students and their families on college-sports possibilities. Coaches may send out 150 form letters to possible prospects, Oden noted. Most of those early feelers go nowhere.

News like this is tragic. Parents and athletes are under false impressions, and as I said, the clock keeps ticking.  Yet, nothing happens.

This isn’t news to me.  I’ve seen it for years.  But I am at the point where I just have to do more about this.  I am stepping up my game so families can step up theirs.

Here’s what I mean. Continue reading

High school footballHow can you be sure you’re doing the right things in your athletic scholarship pursuit?  You may be getting input from friends, coaches, blogs, books, paid services and consultants, not to mention everything you read all over the Internet.

What’s true and what’s not?  It’s a big issue, and I address this and four other points in the premier episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast.

You’ll come away with action steps in the areas of who, what, how, where and when.

The featured question in this episode comes from Bill, “One of the toughest things that we face as coaches and parents, is that we are in a small rural farm community with not a lot around us. Our record is not the greatest, and when you add all of this together, college coaches do not come visit or recruit at our school. How do we get these coaches to reach out to us and our kids?”  Jon answers this question.

BaseballI also shares my personal story and the story of my twin sons who succeeded in getting a fully paid education and competing at the school of their choice.  I’ll explain how they got there and the lessons our family learned.  Lessons you can take to heart, too.

Listen to the podcast.

Jon FuglerSo many families have asked some great questions about recruiting and athletic scholarships, and I’ve been listening. As a result, I’m thrilled to announce a brand new resource that will answer those questions and go beyond what you’ve expressed or imagined.

This is something that I’ve had on my plate for over a year, and it will make its debut in the next two weeks. I’ll be addressing the biggest issues in recruiting and scholarships when I debut the “Athletic Scholarship Podcast.” It’s the only podcast of its kind.

Podcasting is becoming one of the fastest growing digital tools for learning and gathering information on your terms. It’s on demand so it’s on your schedule. This regular audio vault will get right to the heart of what you need to know and do as your family pursues an athletic scholarship. Continue reading

Basketball in hoopGetting an athletic scholarship isn’t all about the money.  Parents and student-athletes can let their pride get in the way of the best choice.  They put the scholarship offer at the top of the list and the kid ends up at a college and program that aren’t the best fit.

In my case, I transferred after just one year.  I really enjoyed my first choice, the University of Minnesota.  But it wasn’t the best fit athletically or academically.

I have to admit that I transferred to Indiana University for athletic reasons, but other factors fell into place to make IU the best fit overall.  I’m glad for my Minnesota experience, but I’m thrilled for my Indiana experience.

I could have saved myself and my parents a lot of stress and expense had I known then what I know today. Continue reading

After the race with my good friend Wayne.

After the race with my good friend Wayne. I’m the one drenched in sweat on the left.

I ran a marathon on Saturday.  OK, it was only 5K, but for me it felt like a marathon.  The humidity was just short of stifling, the temperatures were in the 70s, and it was only 7 am.  On top of that, I was up until 1 am preparing for the launch of Athletic Scholarship University.

And on top of that … yes another “on top of that” statement, the course was a quarter-mile more than 5K!  I know because I had my running app on during the race.  Yeah, somebody had a sense of humor.

Despite all these things, I ran my best race in years!  Maybe it was because this was sea level and I live at 6,800 feet elevation.  I was mighty proud of my 8:55 miles, over 30 seconds ahead of my normal pace.  I was a gazelle.

Now let me draw a comparison to recruiting.  You’re running a marathon, not a 5K.  It can last years, and you need to be ready.  Here’s how you can train for your recruiting marathon.  And that’s how you need to look at it.

#1.  Mental preparation is key.  When I prepared for my 5K, I knew it was going to be warm and humid.  I knew the course was over 5K (I ran it last year).  So I was ready.  In the same way, you need to be mentally ready to run your recruiting course.  If you can anticipate as much as possible, then you’re ahead before you start.  Yes, there will be surprises, but prepare for things you know about in advance.

In recruiting, mentally prepare by going your homework on schools, programs and coaches.  Know in advance which schools are priorities for you.  Go online, make phone calls, place visits.  This is all part of the preparation you should do in order for the recruiting process to run as smooth as it can.  But do be ready for surprises. Continue reading

[NOTE:  The Athletic Scholarship Mini-Course is now open!  To learn the five steps to an athletic scholarship, I invite you to get started by registering for the free Mini-Course and watching the first video.  This course is a must for any family pursuing an athletic scholarship.  The course is designed for parents and is just three lessons.]

TrackSummer is going to end soon, and my question for you is this, “What are you going to do to be ahead of the competition this fall?”

I’m not talking about your son or daughter’s athletic competition, but I’m talking about competition for an athletic scholarship.  If you’ve seen the calendar turn to August and the urgency has hit you, that’s a good thing.

These are urgent times.  The recruiting world is highly competitive, and you need to be proactive as a team with your son or daughter.  If you’ve followed me at all, you know that I’m the guy who pushes you to get in the game.  Don’t wait for college coaches to contact your son or daughter.  It may never happen.

First, as I said up top, make sure you’re going through my free Athletic Scholarship Mini-Course I opened yesterday.  It’s a jump-start opportunity.  You go at your own speed and you can start today, right now, by registering and watching the first video lesson.  This is a 3-part Mini-Course and I teach each 20-30 minute lesson.  This is a slam dunk.  You and your student-athlete need to get registered for this online course.  Do it and you’ll be miles down the road in just one week. Continue reading

TrackI won’t kid you.  The recruiting journey is not easy.   Let’s face it, your son or daughter is probably not in the top 100 in the nation in their sport.  Coaches are not going to flock to them.  The will have to work.

Such was the case with our twin boys.  They were not the best in the league, county or on their team.  They had to put out effort to be seen by college coaches.  Effort off the field in order to be seen on the field.

I remember spending a lot of time with them, helping them write letters, send information to coaches, put together a video, go to camps, travel for tournaments…  all those things.  And you know what?  It was worth it.  Even if they had not gotten a scholarship.  Yeah, we grew close through this experience. Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesI can’t tell you how important it is for you to really make the most of the summer recruiting season.  This is so key, because every sport is out of season on the college level.  The coaches have time to recruit and they’re doing it.

Don’t miss out.  My heart is to see every talented high school athlete get an athletic scholarship at the school and program that is the best fit for them. 

Parents, will you set aside an hour or two and begin the process with your son or daughter?  If you’ve already begun, great!  What more can you do this summer to take advantage of the opportunity to put your son or daughter in front of college coaches?

Some suggestions: Continue reading

View
As I sit here on my back patio and watch the beauty of multiple colors, ominous clouds and majestic mountains, I’m thinking out loud.  Scenes like this make it easy to think.

I’m wondering what things will look like for your family one year from today.  Will you be closer to achieving your family’s scholarship dream?  Will your son or daughter be getting ready to head off to college in a matter of weeks, a scholarship earned?  Or will you be going through a dry period where discouragement sets in?

You know, this is a journey of ups and downs.  I am here to tell you not to get discouraged if there is a dry period, because there will be.  That’s ok.  Such is life, and this scholarship journey is filled with wins and losses, victories and pain.  It’s a lot like competing in sports.

So let me give you three things to think about today, which will help you in the year ahead. Continue reading

Back patio viewAs I sit here blogging on the back patio, with a view in the distance of where my boys played college ball, it is a bit surreal. You see, our family lived 1,100 miles away when our sons came here. My wife and I made the treks every spring to watch them play, but never in a blue moon expected to live here someday.

All three of our kids are still at least 1,100 miles away from us, spread around the world. In fact, one son and his family are 5,000 miles away by my estimate. But, here I am, watching the sun set over the campus, nestled in the foothills in the picture.

I guess you could say I’m “dreaming backwards.” Instead of thinking ahead about college careers and possible scholarships, I’m reflecting on those days they did compete here. And, thankfully, we didn’t have to pay anything.

But, for you, the dream is ahead of you for your son or daughter. I’ve had such a good time lately talking with and having email exchanges with several parents. I’m energized about the opportunity to help their student-athlete get an athletic scholarship.

I’m committed to that.  “But how long does this crazy experience take?” you might be asking “And when should we start?”   But more importantly, I want to share with you how to get extraordinary results.

Continue reading

I was just reading the other day about a local high school girl who made her verbal commitment to a major school for basketball.  I’m sure thousands of high school athletes read the same story and wondered how they could be the next success story.  Parents were asking the same question about their son or daughter.

Jon Fugler

Jon Fugler

In today’s post, I want to discuss three common roadblocks to an athletic scholarship and how to overcome them.  Then maybe your son or daughter will be a future success story documented in the paper.

Roadblock #1:  Lack of focus.   It’s amazing how much money parents will spend to try to get their kids an athletic scholarship.  It may start with less than a hundred dollars for a camp, but somewhere along the way it has escalated to thousands of dollars for multiple camps, tournament exposure, showcases, travel, consultants and services.

You can’t have a shotgun approach, thinking that the more you do the greater the chance for a scholarship.  It comes down to be strategically focused.  You’ll save your family time and money by mapping out your strategy and sticking with it.  Stay focused.  Beware of the voices of other parents and so-called experts who distract you and pull you in different directions.

Roadblock #2:  Laziness.  There, I said it.  In this day and age, people expect things to come easy.  Even as athletes and parents of athletes, we can get caught up in this trap.  As a result, we get lazy about giving our best.  That translates into our efforts to get our kids an athletic scholarship.

But, it’s not just the parent’s deal.  The student-athlete needs to put out.  If the parent is working like crazy at this, but the athlete is not, the team falls apart.  Yes, team.  The parent and the athlete are a team in this and both must avoid laziness at all costs.  This venture is too important for laziness, so have the “hard work” discussion early and often.

Parents, be the coach in the recruiting process.  Do what you can to motivate your son our daughter.  Be positive.  Teach life lessons.  Reward them when they’re giving it their best (I don’t mean on the field).  Make this a positive experience, even to the point where you are the buffer for disappointment.  If you’re discouraged or hit a rough road in this, don’t pass that along to your child.  Have a coach mindset.

Roadblock #3:  Quitting before the breakthrough.  The recruiting process is a marathon, and there will be a point when you hit the wall.  It may be earlier for your son or daughter than it is for you.  It happened to me and it happens to most.

A series of “We’re not interested” letters or calls from coaches can cause you to hit the wall.  A period of silence can do that, too.  Exhaustion from this whole doggone process can convince you to quit.  There are a number of reason you can feel like giving up along the way.

The tragedy will be to quit before the breakthrough.  For our family, our breakthrough was when a coach discovered our sons and pursued them — after a handful of coaches had stopped communicating and had lost interest.  Was it discouraging when there was silence?  Yes, but the breakthrough came shortly afterwards.

Don’t quit too soon.  Your breakthrough could be around the corner.  Even at the last minute.  Continue pursuing possibilities and opportunities.  The coach on the other end of the equation is looking for a breakthrough, too.

Give me your thoughts on roadblocks. Are you facing one now?  Have you come through one and you’ve experienced a breakthrough?  Comment below and let me and others know.

 

Can your son or daughter really get an athletic scholarship in five easy steps?

No, but I assure you that they can get one in five simple steps.  I’ve been teaching families these five steps since 2002, and they work.

 Join me for a free teleseminar for parents:

“FIVE STEPS TO AN ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP”
A Recruiting Seminar for Parents

Tuesday, March 24,  8:00-8:45 PM Eastern Time

I checked and there are no March Madness games that night!

Come with questions, because after I go through the five steps, I’ll open the phone lines for some dialogue.

How to Join the Call

Dial (712) 775-7031
Enter the Conference Code 415-095-289

BONUS:  Because I want you to apply the five steps right away, everyone on the call will receive my Recruiting Checklist.  I’ll let you know how to access it.

To RSVP, email me at jon@recruit-me.com and I’ll reserve your spot.  I encourage you to print out this page as a reminder of the date, time and call-in number.  I’d hate for you to miss the event.

Why Show Up?

You’re going to learn what to do right now in order to get your son or daughter recruited.  I’ll be cutting through the clutter that has left parents shaking their heads, wondering what to do and what not to do.  There’s so much information out there, but no one puts it together into a step-by-step process and plan.  I will do that for you on the 24th.

 

Track star

Recruiting services and consultants can provide benefit for the student-athlete and parents.  I know the truth of that.  Our family benefited greatly from a recruiting coach who walked us all the way through the process.

However, it’s dangerous to give away control of your recruiting campaign.   If you do, you may be in for some unpleasant surprises.  Thankfully, our recruiting coach kept us right in the center of everything.

You can’t just step away and give the process over to someone else. You need to own it.  You need to be involved in the decisions about your son or daughter’s future.  And especially during their scholarship pursuit.  It’s too important to release, even to an expert. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballIt’s November 1.  Do you have a 60-day recruiting plan?

“What’s that?” you ask.

Scholarships don’t happen.  Parents, you need to lead your son or daughter in the recruiting process.  It starts with a plan.

I challenge you to establish a 60-day plan, which will carry you through the end of the year.  This is a good time to do that, with the year-end as your finish line.  Your finish line to an athletic scholarship?  No, your next yard-marker.

Here are some things that you need to include in your 60-day plan: Continue reading

College CoachesThere are 3 things that you and your son or daughter can do to keep the coaches’ interest over the long haul. The first and most important one is that you keep communicating with the coaches. That may sound obvious but you would be surprised at how often families just sit back and don’t do anything after the first contact. We talk to coaches and they tell us if you stop communicating, they will assume you have lost interest and your son or daughter moves off their list.

So above all, you have to keep communicating.  I don’t mean calling or writing the coaches with no purpose, but by having some substance when you do contact them. There are some key documents that you can send coaches on a regular basis that they welcome and it works great to keep their interest. Continue reading

(Note:  The Athletic Scholarship and Recruiting Survey is now closed.  Thank you to all who participated.  I am compiling the responses and look forward to soon sharing with you what I learned, and responding to the biggest issues in an upcoming online class I will be teaching this Fall). 

Uphill bike rideToday, I rode 12 1/2 miles on my bike at over 8,000 feet elevation.  It took two and a half hours to make it to my destination.

Am I that bad a cyclist?

Not really.  Most of the ride was uphill, and at 8,000 feet, it was a huge challenge.  But I made it.  As I was riding, I was thinking about how my journey has lessons in it for student-athletes seeking athletic scholarships.  There are three things I’d like to share with you today. Continue reading

(Before you get into this post, can I ask for your help?  If you haven’t responded yet, I’d like to get your response to a few questions in our Athletic Scholarship and Recruiting SurveyI’d like to know your what you’re thinking and experiencing.  I’ve gotten a lot of helpful responses in the past few days.  Thanks for adding your voice!)

One of the mRunnerost common questions I get from athletes and parents is, “When should we start?”

You’re asking the question of  “when is too early, when is too late, and when is just right?”

I recommend families start, ideally, in the athlete’s freshman year in high school.  But this rarely happens, so don’t get worried if you didn’t do that.  You can make up the time.  This is the year when, together, you want to look at possible good fits.  Research schools from both the academic and athletic standpoint.  Gather as much information as you can.

As schools rise to the surface, those are the ones you need to dig into further.  Find out as much as you can about the athletic programs and about the academic areas of interest.  I believe it is too early to contact schools because the coaches are looking at juniors and seniors that can help their programs in the near future. Continue reading

BaseballHigh school athletes across America are preparing for a summer full of competition.  Many of these athletes are scholarship caliber and are hoping that college coaches will come see them compete.  Indeed, this is a great recruiting season, because all college coaches are out of season.

However, you must have a plan in order to be seen.  A month ago, we started preparing you for the summer recruiting season.  Now here are a few non-negotiables in order to be seen:

1.  Put together a one-sheet profile and your summer competition schedule, then send it to coaches at schools you are interested in.  This is by far the most important thing you need to do.  This recruiting season is short, so get started right away.  This is a good way to grab a coach’s interest.  I recommend sending to 40-50 schools, either by mail or email.  You cannot expect a coach to find you unless you raise your hand.  This is one way to do that.  If you’re already in relationship with certain coaches, then all you need to do is send them your schedule and a short note. Continue reading

RunnerIMPORTANT:  Make plans to attend the Free teleseminar, The 7 Most-Asked Recruiting and Scholarship Questions by Parents and High School Student-Athletes.

Tuesday, April 29, 8:00 pm Eastern Time

Call-in number: (605) 475-4700
Access Code (Pin Number): 450246#

Please RSVP to support@recruit-me.com so we are sure to have enough lines open.

**************************************

So how much money is really out there for athletic scholarships?  The number may astound you, but keep in mind that this is divided among tens of thousands of athletes:

NCAA Division I and II schools offer athletic scholarships. Division III schools offer academic scholarships only.  NCAA members provide more than $1.5 billion in athletics scholarships annually.

NAIA members provide more than 60,000 student-athletes with opportunities to play college sports, earning $500 million in scholarships.

If you read my previous post, you saw how these dollars are divided by sport.  And in most cases, the scholarships are not full rides.  However, student-athletes can combine athletic scholarships with other grants.  As stated by the NCAA:

“Thousands of student-athletes benefit from academic scholarships and need-based aid, such as federal Pell Grants. In addition, there is money available from the NCAA’s own Student-Athlete Opportunity Fund. Sometimes student-athletes cannot accept Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesA question which comes up often regarding scholarships is, “How many scholarships are available?”  There are a number of ways to answer that, but I thought it would be helpful to look at how many there are per school per sport.   The following information is for the NCAA.

First of all, the data I want to share with you is the maximum allowable scholarships.  It all depends on funds available at that particular school as to whether the maximum is available for the program.   For instance, if a golf coach is not a good fundraiser, he or she may not be able to fulfill the maximum allowable scholarship limit.  It would be good to ask the coaches how many scholarships he or she has for their sport.  Continue reading

BasketballStudent-athletes across America have athletic scholarships on their mind, with many of them focusing on the schools they’re seeing this month competing for the NCAA basketball crown.  March Madness is a powerful recruiting tool for schools, especially the Cinderella teams that keep plugging along, upsetting the favorites.

If you’re a student-athlete, and you’re pumped about the chances of getting an athletic scholarship, transform the enthusiasm into action.  You certainly won’t get any closer unless you turn watching basketball into focused steps.  

Your first step is to make a list of schools you’d like to compete at.  Consider your athletic ability and which Continue reading

She was once an aspiring high school athlete like you, and after many achievements in her sport (two sports actually), she has earned an honor far beyond performance.

Meet Elizabeth Phillips, seven-time All-American and biomedical engineering graduate of Washington University in St. Louis − the 2012 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Phillips was chosen from among nine finalists during the 22nd annual NCAA Woman of the Year awards program Sunday night in Indianapolis. The award honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academic achievement, athletics excellence, community service and leadership.

“Winning Woman of the Year was really exciting! I was so surprised when my name was read,” said Phillips. “It is exciting to put my school on the map in that way and to…   more