emailing coaches

Student-athleteI’ve had many athletes  come to me and ask how to get on a coach’s radar.  My first response is always that “you have to make the first move.”  Specifically, it’s important that you make a good first impression, and that comes off the field.

You have to write a good introductory email or letter in order to get a coach’s interest.  Here are five pointers:

1. Make it your email. This email (or letter) must come from the athlete, because that’s who the coaches will want to build a relationship with.  We encourage parents to help craft the letter, but make sure it’s from the athlete.

2. Make it brief. The key to an effective letter or email can be summed up in one word: BRIEF.  The goal is not to share your life story or all your great athletic achievements.  That will come later, but a long introductory letter will turn off the coach quickly.  He’s only going to read the first page anyway. Therefore… Continue reading

BaseballHere’s “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #3″, in a daily series of 5, giving you a solid edge in the critical summer recruiting season. This is Recruiting Breakthrough Week.

Breakthrough Recruiting Edge of the Day: Send updates after every season and significant educational milestone.

The key to continued interest by college coaches is “communication.”  You must keep showing interest or the coach’s interest in your athlete will fade.  Coaches have a busy schedule and a lot of recruits on their radar, so you have to keep your son or daughter in front of them. Continue reading

BaseballI was thinking about some of the big questions parents and athletes ask me about what it takes to get an athletic scholarship. Most people know so little about it.

I was there once, when I was working on getting my sons recruited.  But over the years, I’ve become an expert who has helped thousands of other families.

I can’t give all the answers in one post, but I can give you one:  hard work.

For example, I was reading about Lindsay Brown, who accepted a scholarship offer for volleyball. She had interestVolleyball from several schools, including New Hampshire, Oregon State, Louisiana Tech, Lewis & Clark College, Dominican University, Menlo College, UC Santa Barbara and UC Riverside. She chose Sonoma State, which is near her home town. Continue reading

EmailI want to give you three words that will get a college coach to open your introductory email.

I just completed a couple interviews with college coaches and one of the questions I asked them was, “How do you like to be contacted by a student-athlete?”

There was one thing in common from both coaches, who were on opposite ends of the country by the way.  They said they delete any emails that are not personal.  If it’s a group email or has no sign of custom touch, they’re gone.  Not only did these two coaches say that, they started getting a little excited when they told me.  I knew this was a big deal.

So, if you’ve sent emails with the subject line, “Recruiting” or something as bland as that, your email probably wasn’t read.  And, if your email starts with, “Dear Coach,” it probably got deleted, too. Continue reading

College CoachesThere are 3 things that you and your son or daughter can do to keep the coaches’ interest over the long haul. The first and most important one is that you keep communicating with the coaches. That may sound obvious but you would be surprised at how often families just sit back and don’t do anything after the first contact. We talk to coaches and they tell us if you stop communicating, they will assume you have lost interest and your son or daughter moves off their list.

So above all, you have to keep communicating.  I don’t mean calling or writing the coaches with no purpose, but by having some substance when you do contact them. There are some key documents that you can send coaches on a regular basis that they welcome and it works great to keep their interest. Continue reading

RunnerYou’d like to gain ground in your scholarship efforts this Fall, and that’s a good thing.  I want you to get closer to your scholarship, too.

This is an important season in the recruiting calendar.  Here are three things you can do right away to maximize the Fall recruiting season:

1.  Cast a wide net.  How big is your prospective list of schools?  If it is less than 40, it’s too small.  Whether you’re getting started now or you’ve been at it for a while, you need to expand your list to 40 prospective schools so you can pursue a relationship with the coaches from those programs.

You might be saying,  “I’m being recruited by some schools.  Why do I need more?”  You just never know where things will land, and you need to have as many recruiting relationships as possible.  There are other schools you don’t yet have on your list that will be your top choices a few months from now. Continue reading

What’s the best way to get on a college coach’s radar when seeking an athletic scholarship?

First of all, you need to come to terms that in order to get recruited, the burden is on you to contact coaches and do it the right way.  There are wrong ways, and taking one of these wrong appCollege coachesroaches can hurt you.  Make sure you get things started on the right foot.  There are some common misguided approaches we’ve seen people try before learning the right way. 

Let me go over the wrong ways, because none of these are effective.  They may appear to be effective at first glance, but they are usually harmful to your chances at getting a college coach’s interest.  For instance, sending out hundreds of identical “Dear coach…” emails.  Coaches can smell spam a mile away.  If they get a non personalized email, they are just going to hit “delete”.  There is a role for email contact, but not this way. Continue reading