recruiting questions

QuestionWhen it comes to evaluating their son or daughter, parents usually make one of two mistakes:

  1.  They overrate them, or
  2.  They underrate them

Let’s be honest about it.  There’s usually no way we can be objective in evaluating our kid’s athletic ability. 

If that’s the case, how can we know whether they can get a scholarship?  Or, if they can, at what level?  What’s realistic?

I know I faced each of those questions with my twin sons.  I so much wanted them to make it in college as athletes.  I believed they could get scholarships.  I’m not sure how strongly they believed it.  I led the charge and they followed … and got that fully paid education while competing in the sport they loved.

Now it’s your turn to make that call.  How far can your athlete go?  Is he or she athletic scholarship material?  Continue reading

Track communicationIt’s been a good Recruiting Breakthrough Week. I’ve alerted you to a critical recruiting season that will happen over the next 60-90 days. Summer is huge, especially since all college sports will be out of season and the coaches are recruiting heavily.

I urge you–make this truly a Recruiting Breakthrough Week for your family. It leads to a Breakthrough Summer. Please don’t miss the golden opportunity.

Here’s your “Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5.” It’s your last one and will indeed give you a recruiting edge this summer.

Recruiting Breakthrough Edge of the Day #5: Track your communications with coaches with excellence. It pays off. Continue reading

Baseball basketball volleyball footballI receive a lot of questions from student-athletes and parents when it comes to recruiting and scholarships.  I remember when I was going through the process with my twin sons, and I had a lot of questions, too.  Here are a couple I’ve received that have risen to the top.  I thought it would be helpful to post them and respond to them, because you may be asking  similar questions.

Q:  I play varsity doubles and have received all-state for 2 years, but it seems very hard to get noticed at the regional/national level in doubles. Any suggestions?

A:  Your struggle is not an uncommon problem for most high school athletes. Even talented ones like yourself get overlooked. Most colleges’ recruiting budgets are limited, and the coaches cannot get out to see that many players. They rely on tournaments, showcases and camps to see large numbers of players at once. Only for exceptional prospects will a coach normally travel to see an individual game or match.

For these reasons, it is extremely important that you take the initiative to let college coaches know about you. Be aggressive in pursuing the schools where you have an interest. Once you make contact with the coaches, you open the door for continued contact. They will write back if they see that you have the tools to play on their team. Your letter, player profile, completed questionnaire, video (if they ask for one), and regular updates are those tools. Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesFor a high school student-athlete, there aren’t many things more frightening than talking with a college coach on the phone. It can be daunting. And it should be. You’ve been dreaming of getting an athletic scholarship and now the coaches are calling. You’re on the spot.

You need to prepare for these occasions. Once you take a few calls, you’ll get more comfortable. That is, until you get a call from a coach you really want to play for. This school is on your A list. You’ve been hoping he or she will call. And now it happens. It can really make you nervous.

When taking a coach’s call, try to relax. He or she will understand you’re nervous. That’s ok.

Secondly, have a list of questions ready. If the coach is calling your cell phone, you’ll have to think quickly. The list will have to be in your head. Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsYou can get duped by believing things that just aren’t true.  And in the recruiting world, this can kill your athletic scholarship.

I just finished recording the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast, and I spoke passionately about three of the most damaging myths.  Then I lay out the truth.  The podcast will release in a couple days, but here’s a sneak preview:

Myth #1:  If my kid is good enough, college coaches will find him or her.

Truth: A very small percentage of high school student-athletes receive scholarships because the coach “happened to find him or her.” Only the top-line elite athletes—the top 100 or so nationally—receive enough national media recognition that they are automatically recruited without having to make an effort. Continue reading

NCAAWhat’s the #1 question you wish you could ask to college coaches about recruiting?

Now’s the time to ask it and get a candid answer.

I’m about ready to start a series of college coach audio interviews and I’ll include your question in one of more of my interviews.   Once I have the audios produced I’ll make them available in my upcoming new podcast, in my blog, and more completely inside Athletic Scholarship University.

There’s no reason to walk in the dark when it comes to getting clear information from the people your son or daughter needs to have an impact on.  I hear from a number of parents who have some good questions.  I can give my answers, but there’s nothing like hearing from coaches themselves.  I think it will save you a lot of time and money as you go through the recruiting process.

So go ahead and write your question in the comments section below and I’ll bring it to the coaches.  Then I’ll let you know when I’ll be posting their answers. Continue reading