student-athletes

Student-athleteI’ve had many athletes  come to me and ask how to get on a coach’s radar.  My first response is always that “you have to make the first move.”  Specifically, it’s important that you make a good first impression, and that comes off the field.

You have to write a good introductory email or letter in order to get a coach’s interest.  Here are five pointers:

1. Make it your email. This email (or letter) must come from the athlete, because that’s who the coaches will want to build a relationship with.  We encourage parents to help craft the letter, but make sure it’s from the athlete.

2. Make it brief. The key to an effective letter or email can be summed up in one word: BRIEF.  The goal is not to share your life story or all your great athletic achievements.  That will come later, but a long introductory letter will turn off the coach quickly.  He’s only going to read the first page anyway. Therefore… Continue reading

TrackI had a great conversation one night with a man who has dedicated his life to helping student-athletes land at the right school… with the right scholarship.  We agreed on a number of points:

1.  Unless you’re a Blue Chip athlete, you will likely not be “found” by college coaches.  You need to take your scholarship efforts into your own hands as a family and get out there to be seen by college coaches.  Not only that, but you must do the right things.  A shotgun approach to this will not work.  You’ll be disappointed.  You need to have a game plan, just like you do when you’re competing as an athlete. Continue reading

Recruiting phone callIt could come as a phone call, email, letter or even a text. Your kid has been contacted by a college coach.  This coach is recruiting your son or daughter for an athletic scholarship. You might be feeling an adrenaline rush when this happens.

You ask yourself, “What should we do?”

Here are some words of advice:

1. Stay calm. This is just a first contact. You haven’t been offered a scholarship yet.  It’s important to realize that the coach is beginning the recruiting process with your son or daughter and there is a long road ahead.  It may or may not work out.  That’s what you are trying to find out and the coach is trying to find out.

Welcome the contact.  If the coach asks for more information, provide it promptly.  Send or email documents and video link if that’s what is asked for. Continue reading

ChristmasFirst of all, Merry Christmas!  I hope your family will experience the joy of Jesus’ birth, God’s gift to a needy world.

I want to discuss three common roadblocks to an athletic scholarship and how to overcome them.  Then maybe your son or daughter will be a future success story.

Roadblock #1:  Lack of focus.   It’s amazing how much money parents will spend to try to get their kids an athletic scholarship.  It may start with less than a hundred dollars for a camp, but somewhere along the way it has escalated to thousands of dollars for multiple camps, tournament exposure, showcases, travel, consultants and services.

You can’t have a shotgun approach, thinking that the more you do the greater the chance for a scholarship.  It comes down to be strategically focused.  You’ll save your family time and money by mapping out your strategy and sticking with it.  Stay focused.  Beware of the voices of other parents and so-called experts who distract you and pull you in different directions. Continue reading

Athletic scholarship questionsYou can get duped by believing things that just aren’t true.  And in the recruiting world, this can kill your athletic scholarship.

I just finished recording the next episode of the Athletic Scholarship Podcast, and I spoke passionately about three of the most damaging myths.  Then I lay out the truth.  The podcast will release in a couple days, but here’s a sneak preview:

Myth #1:  If my kid is good enough, college coaches will find him or her.

Truth: A very small percentage of high school student-athletes receive scholarships because the coach “happened to find him or her.” Only the top-line elite athletes—the top 100 or so nationally—receive enough national media recognition that they are automatically recruited without having to make an effort. Continue reading

VolleyballRecruiting is a hard world, and if you don’t have your act together, it can beat you up.  Here are the first three of a dozen recruiting rules that I’ve laid out for families.  I hope these three help.  You can get the full dozen (and three bonus rules!) by downloading the Guide I’ve put together.

Download “12 Rules of Recruiting and Athletic Scholarships”

Recruiting Rule #1:  Know When to Start. 

The number one question I get from parents is, “When should we start the recruiting process?”

I remember getting an email from one parent whose son was a senior, asking if it was too late. A moment later, I received an email from a freshman parent asking if it was too early! So, as you can see, there is some confusion out there.

You should start early. In fact, as early as the freshman year, if that’s possible. But, even if you are in the senior year, it’s still probably not too late. You just have to work faster. Continue reading

Tomorrow night is my premier webinar and you’re invited:

5 Step to an Athletic Scholarship:  How to Get Recruited in 30 Days.

I’ll be walking you through the five steps that will give you the focus and direction your family needs in this exciting and challenging journey.  I don’t know where you’re at in the process, but I do know that you’ll come away from this webinar with solid steps of action.  When we did the recruiting thing with our sons, it was a huge blessing to have someone guide us and give us specific steps of action.  You’ll get that tomorrow night.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

9 PM Eastern/ 8 PM Central/ 7 PM Mountain/ 6 PM Pacific

My Video Invite to You

If you follow just the first two steps, your student-athlete will start hearing from coaches in 30 days or less.

How to Watch

This high-energy live video event will be presented on the LIVE WEBINAR PAGE , as well as on YouTube and Google Hangouts. Choose your way.

Watch on your computer or any mobile device. If you’re using your mobile device, you may want to watch on YouTube.

RSVP

Please RSVP by emailing me or on the Event Page and I’ll see you Thursday night, November 5. Invite other parents and athletes to attend.

Everyone attending will receive a Recruiting Checklist as a follow-up to what I teach you on the webinar.

To watch on Google Hangouts, follow this link:

https://plus.google.com/events/cgr7tavvgukf6qimdj54157avu4

Athletic scholarship questionsRecruiting can be a mess.

How’s that for an opening line?  Well, it’s true and sometimes I just need to say it.  It’s so confusing that parents and athletes are left at the starting line while the clock keeps ticking on a kid’s high school career.

How about you?  Are you confused or discouraged?  Have you been spinning your wheels or fallen into a ditch?  Or has your experience been pretty good, even excellent?  Share your experience in the comment section below.  Other parents can benefit from what you have to say.  And I’d like to know what you’re dealing with.

This quote is from a Forbes article earlier this month:

“A lot of kids think they’re being recruited, when they really aren’t,” said Kimberly Oden, a former Stanford volleyball player who now advises high-school students and their families on college-sports possibilities. Coaches may send out 150 form letters to possible prospects, Oden noted. Most of those early feelers go nowhere.

News like this is tragic. Parents and athletes are under false impressions, and as I said, the clock keeps ticking.  Yet, nothing happens.

This isn’t news to me.  I’ve seen it for years.  But I am at the point where I just have to do more about this.  I am stepping up my game so families can step up theirs.

Here’s what I mean. Continue reading

BallsI’ve been looking around and no one has done it, so I decided I would.  I’m launching the Athletic Scholarship Podcast in a couple days. In the first episode, I’m starting with a couple stories.  My story and your story.  I want you to hear my experiences over the years and how they might translate into yours.

I want to help you with your story from this day forward.  That’s what the Athletic Scholarship Podcast is all about.

In the first episode, I dig into five things that will help you avoid pain, disappointment and financial disaster.  I thought I’d preview the first one here with you in writing.

#1: WHO.

Be careful who you listen to.  There’s so much bad advice out there and it can cost you.  Not only financially, but your son or daughter’s future.  Their college future is too important to mess with, and you need to be careful.

You can get a lot of information online, but how good is it?  Just because the website looks good doesn’t mean you should believe the content.  I say that even for the things you read on my site.  Verify, verify, verify.  Check the information against what you see, read, and hear elsewhere.  If there’s consistency, then it’s likely that the advice is valid. Continue reading

[NOTE:  Five Steps to an Athletic Scholarship, a Free Mini-Course from Recruit-Me, will be available in just a few days.  This is the only step-by-step course available today and will expand on some of the things in this blog post, as well as much more.  Check back in a few days and you’ll see how to get started with the first lesson.]

Signing Most people don’t understand the process that gets an athlete recruited.  The official signing is what most of us see or hear about, but we have no idea what went into getting the student-athlete in that position.

Is it a big mystery?  To most families, it is.  So let me lay out five factors that cause an athlete to get recruited:

1.  Talent.  There’s no substitute for this.  But don’t be fooled.  Your son or daughter doesn’t need to be the best in the league or on the team.  They key is that he or she has the talent to compete at the next level.  If that’s the case, there’s a good chance a scholarship is in their future.  It’s important to cast your net wide, because you don’t know which programs are looking for recruits at your son or daughter’s talent level.  Don’t get hung up on particular schools at the outset.  It will take time to see which ones are the best fit. Continue reading