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10 Recruiting questionsHere are 10 of the top questions parents are asking about athletic scholarships.  As we close out 2015 and turn the calendar to the new year, I hope the answers to these questions will keep you pointed in the right direction.

Before we get into them, I want to remind you that my free Recruiting Mini-Course will take you step-by-step through the things you need to do in 2016.  I encourage you to watch this three-part video tutorial.

And now, here are the questions:

ONE:  What’s included in an athletic scholarship?   It depends on the offer, but a scholarship can range from a full ride to a portion of a student-athlete’s college expenses.  Your kid may be offered tuition, or room and board, or books, or a combination of these things.  Each sport has a limit on the number of scholarships it can offer, so the coach has to divide the dollars between the scholarship athletes.

TWO:  How do I get my kid noticed by college coaches?  The most important thing is to take the initiative.  Don’t wait for college coaches to find your son or daughter, because it probably won’t happen.  Sure, the elite athletes get discovered easily.  However, in most cases, kids need to take the first step in order to get the attention of college coaches.  What you should do is put together and send a good, short introductory packet that makes a good first impression on coaches at the schools you have interest in.  You’ll be surprised how this simple step can produce amazing results.

THREE:  Are athletic scholarships guaranteed for four years?  No.  Scholarships are usually awarded year-to-year, although the NCAA allows multi-year offers.  If a student-athlete performs poorly, he can lose his scholarship the next year.  Behavior and grades are other factors that can affect an athlete’s scholarship renewal.  It is important to read the language of the scholarship agreement and ask questions.

[Special Note:  I wanted to alert you to the $60 Off Sale on any Recruit-Me Premium Membership.  Check it out.  Sale ends January 5.]

FOUR:  How common is a full-ride scholarship?  Full ride scholarships are only offered in “head count sports.”  The remainder of the sports are called “equivalency sports,” where coaches divide the scholarships among the scholarship athletes.   These athletes receive “partial scholarships.”  Full-ride sports at the D1 level are  football, men and women’s basketball, and women’s gymnastics, volleyball and tennis.

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TrackI won’t kid you.  The recruiting journey is not easy.   Let’s face it, your son or daughter is probably not in the top 100 in the nation in their sport.  Coaches are not going to flock to them.  The will have to work.

Such was the case with our twin boys.  They were not the best in the league, county or on their team.  They had to put out effort to be seen by college coaches.  Effort off the field in order to be seen on the field.

I remember spending a lot of time with them, helping them write letters, send information to coaches, put together a video, go to camps, travel for tournaments…  all those things.  And you know what?  It was worth it.  Even if they had not gotten a scholarship.  Yeah, we grew close through this experience. Continue reading

NCAA ConferencesI can’t tell you how important it is for you to really make the most of the summer recruiting season.  This is so key, because every sport is out of season on the college level.  The coaches have time to recruit and they’re doing it.

Don’t miss out.  My heart is to see every talented high school athlete get an athletic scholarship at the school and program that is the best fit for them. 

Parents, will you set aside an hour or two and begin the process with your son or daughter?  If you’ve already begun, great!  What more can you do this summer to take advantage of the opportunity to put your son or daughter in front of college coaches?

Some suggestions: Continue reading

TrackI’m going to scare a lot of parents with this blog post. I’m going against the grain of a well-funded industry. And I’m going to reveal some things to you that you won’t want to hear.

I’ve heard from many parents over the years about how they were disillusioned by recruiting services and online registries. The latter are sites where you can upload a profile and video of your son or daughter.

And many college coaches are disappointed, too. An article in the Times Herald-Record in Middletown, CT revealed some pretty candid statements by area college coaches. Check this out: Continue reading

BaseballHigh school athletes across America are preparing for a summer full of competition.  Many of these athletes are scholarship caliber and are hoping that college coaches will come see them compete.  Indeed, this is a great recruiting season, because all college coaches are out of season.

However, you must have a plan in order to be seen.  A month ago, we started preparing you for the summer recruiting season.  Now here are a few non-negotiables in order to be seen:

1.  Put together a one-sheet profile and your summer competition schedule, then send it to coaches at schools you are interested in.  This is by far the most important thing you need to do.  This recruiting season is short, so get started right away.  This is a good way to grab a coach’s interest.  I recommend sending to 40-50 schools, either by mail or email.  You cannot expect a coach to find you unless you raise your hand.  This is one way to do that.  If you’re already in relationship with certain coaches, then all you need to do is send them your schedule and a short note. Continue reading

Athletic scholarshipLike most people, I doubt you have time to listen to a one-hour podcast on recruiting.  Many did last week, but if you weren’t one of them, then here are the cliff notes for you to take in — and hopefully apply.

Here are the top seven questions that come up when I’m talking with people about recruiting and athletic scholarships, followed by bullet point answers:

1. How can I get noticed and recruited?

• Myth: Coach will find you.

• Take the initiative. Don’t wait for coaches to contact you.

• The fallacy that top line athletes are the only ones who get contacted.

• Most scholarships are awarded to athletes that make the first contact.

$15 off coupon• Coaches do not have the budget to travel the country or even much of the region.

• First impression usually comes from an athlete that contacts a coach. Continue reading

BasketballStudent-athletes across America have athletic scholarships on their mind, with many of them focusing on the schools they’re seeing this month competing for the NCAA basketball crown.  March Madness is a powerful recruiting tool for schools, especially the Cinderella teams that keep plugging along, upsetting the favorites.

If you’re a student-athlete, and you’re pumped about the chances of getting an athletic scholarship, transform the enthusiasm into action.  You certainly won’t get any closer unless you turn watching basketball into focused steps.  

Your first step is to make a list of schools you’d like to compete at.  Consider your athletic ability and which Continue reading

College campuses aD1 Conferencesre about to open across the country for the Fall semester.  The TV will be swarming with football games, and every one on the field will be a scholarship athlete.  D1 schools, at least.

So how did these guys get a scholarship?  How did coaches find them?  What does it take to be a scholarship athlete?  How can my son or daughter get a prized athletic scholarship next year, or the year after that… or the year after that?

These are good questions, and they deserve answers. 

Yes, coaches of all sports are looking for scholarship athletes, and they’re looking year-round.  Recruiting is a big business, and coaches must be as good at recruiting as they are at coaching.  That’s the difference between an average program and a great program. 

How does a high school athlete, get in the cross-hairs?  In a good way, of course.  How does he or she get on a coaches’ radar?  I was interviewed by a reporter a couple days ago and told him what I tell you… take the initiative.  Don’t sit back and wait, or you’ll miss that scholarship.

Do you really think all those scholarship athletes you’ll see on TV this fall were somehow just “discovered” by their coaches?  Some yes, but most no.  They had to do some work to get noticed.  And that’s what we have been pounding into the minds of our Recruit-Me families for over a decade.   Here are some fast-start actions:

1.  Pull together a database of colleges you’re interested in.  Get the coaches’ contact information.  It is all available online on their websites.

2.  Begin crafting your introductory letter and email.  Keep it short. 

3.  Begin shooting your performance video.  You can put in on YouTube when you’re done.  That way, you can send coaches there when you contact them.

I also want to urge you to get some help.  You’ll find some resources on our website, and there are also other places you can go online to enhance your athletic scholarship experience. 

Now get started.