Jon Fugler, scholarship coachIn all the years I’ve been involved in recruiting, first as a parent and then as a recruiting coach, it is crystal clear that getting a scholarship involves three investments and three great returns.

The first investment is time.  You need to be willing to invest the time it takes to pursue an athletic scholarship. For our family, the investment yielded enormous returns.  I’m talking about both the parent and the athlete investing time.

Here are three things you must do with your time in order to capture an athletic scholarship:

  1. Pursue college coaches.  Sounds strange?  Aren’t they the ones doing the recruiting?  Yes, but if you don’t show interest, they’ll move on to the next recruit.  Build the relationships with key college coaches.  These are coaches are showing an interest in you.  Relationships take time.
  2. Keep the resume up to date.  Parents, your kid’s athletic and academic history is growing and changing every season or semester.  Be sure to take the time to go through the resume and make sure it is completely up to date.  I recommend doing this every month.  Coaches will want to see your latest information.  You’d be surprised how often that needs updating.
  3. Improve. Yes, athlete, you’ve got to be improving continuously.  Practice more, compete more, find a mentor to challenge and teach you.  Keep in mind, that other recruits are working hard to improve, and you don’t want to be left behind.

The second investment is money.  There is no free ride to get a free ride. Whether you pursue the scholarship on your own or go Cadillac with a consultant or service, you will have to invest money. Recruiting resources, camps, clinics, trips, showcases, video production, etc.

However, make wise investments.  You can go broke at this.  Don’t get caught up in activity, such as attending camp after camp.  Do it strategically, attending recruiting camps at colleges you’re interested in.  You want to be seen by the right coaches.  Parents, I would budget for 3-4 camps over the entire recruiting effort– period.

The third investment is heart.  This is not a process for the weak of heart. It’s a long haul and it can wear you out. But the rewards are well worth it. Don’t lose heart. Commit your heart to the process.

That’s why it is important not to go at it alone.  This is a team effort– parent and athlete.  you’re going to need each other.  Remember, this is a marathon and not a sprint.  Just like a season, you’ll have ups and downs and good and bad stretches.  Keep the end in mind– winning an athletic scholarship.  You’ve got to have a vision.

The returns?

First, the scholarship, of course. For our family, it was over $200,000 per student-athlete. It was well worth the investments we made.

Second, going to the school of your student-athlete’s choice. It may not be your first choice, but it you make the investments above, your son or daughter will likely be able to attend a school on his or her short list.

Third, competing in a program that really wants your student-athlete there.  The coach has chosen him or her and is making an investment. You can be sure that he or she wants your son or daughter there and is committed to them.

Now, are you ready to make the commitments it will take to get a scholarship?

I’m here to help, so feel free to ask advice.

 

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